Useful Toy Motors

I can never resist taking apart Dollar Store gadgets to see what's inside, what makes them work and can I use the parts for my models.
This time round it is a $2 9Vdc motorized paper stapler. I don't have a clue how the stapler works as I couldn't get it to fire the staple. So off came the covers. I had to snip the plastic shell off, destroyed it in the process and then unscrew something like a dozen mini screws.
This is the loot. A small motor with a metal drive gear to drive a train of four metal reduction gears to finally drive a 2 3/8 inch radius metal swing arm that fires the staple.
The motor has a mini on-off switch and two other mini switches in series. One is a lever operated on-off limit switch. The other is a spring loaded plunger mini switch for rotation direction (normal and reverse when plunger is fully depressed.) The parts in this set up is already worth a lot more than $2. I haven't figured out what I will do with them yet.
The reduction gear train is made of metal and therefore very durable and suitable for high powered motors I shall be using for large RC boats. They comprise 1pc 1 inch disc gear. 2 pcs 1 inch gears with a smaller 1/4 inch flange gear. 1 pc 3/4 inch gear with a 1/2 inch flange gear. I shall have to buy two more staplers in case the boat project has triple propellers.
I haven't any ideas to use the swing arm.
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PaPa Peng wrote the following:

I have a couple of old portable CD players - the kind used like the Walkman, but plays a full sized music CD. It is about 3/4" thick and about 3/4" wider in diameter than a CD. I was wondering if I can use the drive motor in it for something. I don't know what the speed of this particular motor is but it has to spin in the thousands of RPMs. I wonder if it could take some gearing down without losing too much power, like for static model plane props (not RC). If so, I can power two single engine planes or one twin engine plane. Maybe I'd have to secure the planes down to a base lest it tries to take off. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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CD drives rotate up to about 200 rpm max, the speed changes as the head moves in and out on the surface of the disc. I have an old Airfix Rotodyne in the stash that'd look rather good with all three props turning.
Regards
Mike
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As for spinning props - it should spin anything that presents a mechanical load equal to or less than the weight of a motionless CD, huh. ;-)
I've never cracked one open but I would imagine the CD player is belt driven, and probably not at 1:1. So you might have some speed reduction going on already. I know next to nothing about electro, but IIRC resistors and resistance circuits are a basic means of introducing speed control into a motor circuit. I'm sure there are slicker ways and none of them should cost a lot of $$$.
WmB
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WmB wrote the following:

I cracked one open. It was an Emerson portable CD player driven by 2 AA batteries. No belts. There are two motors in it, a direct one to drive the CD turntable, and the other is geared down to advance the laser across the CD. The round motor is a direct drive to spin the CD, and the cylinder motor to advance the laser with reduction gears. Pic here
http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/8789/cdplayermotors.jpg
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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WmB wrote:

You'd be wrong. All the CD drives I've seen have a direct drive pancake motor in the middle. The downside is, you'd need the controller as well, CD's and DVD's spin at different rates depending on where the read head is on the disk. The motor controller is going to be a small IC though, not much of a weight penalty.
The head positioning motor is a small stepper motor, and only provides coarse positioning, the fine positioning is done by a moveable mirror in the read/write head.
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Alan Dicey wrote the following:

As I said earlier, I took the CD player apart. I just now put two AA batteries in series and added wires and both motors spun at full RPM. Not much torque and even less sound. I could see the gear turning on the shaft of the one motor, but I had to put the CD spool on the pancake motor shaft to see that it was spinning. Hint: If you don't have a battery compartment to complete a circuit ( I didn't ), put the two batteries + to - end and place two strips of plastic tape long enough to cover almost the full length of both batteries on each side of the batteries stretching the tape so that when they contract they will hold the battery poles together. The add extra lengths of wire, if necessary, to reach the motor wires.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I stand corrected - well, seated. Must be thinking of something else - floppy drives mebbe? PC repairs are the only electro thing I've ever done with any regularity or frequency (long, long time ago) and I know I saw a lot of belt driven drives somewhere.
Anyway you slice it, the CD player motor sounds like more trouble than its worth (for an electro clueless like myself) when you can order up the specfic motor and controller to suit your application with regards to the mechanical load and torque requirements.
But if one is smart with those things I suppose its worth a shot.
WmB
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This is probably what you are looking for.
http://homepages.enterprise.net/jayjay/cdrom_motors.htm Cdrom motors
[Here we go; these fascinating compact brushless motors are a hobbyists' and tinkerers' delight. The base structure is the platter motor from a dismantled computer cd-rom drive. Easily and cheaply available, dead or old drives can be begged from computer shops or friends, I even bought one once! At the time of writing I have one working reliably in my Moth microheli. It is powerful and weighs only 24grams. You will need a brushless, sensorless motor controller to drive one, I've used an old Jeti06, Castle Creations Phoenix 10, and a Tsunami 10 successfully.]
Do a google search for outrunner motors and you will get more hits. If you need small rare earth magnets Radio Shack has a blister pack of four (?)pill sized magnets for two bucks. Also google for suppliers if you need larger numbers of rare earth magnets or of a different shape and size.
I'll pass up on this project (outrunner motors) myself.
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wrote:

[pinky finger to corner of mouth] "Yes... laaaaaaaaaaaazzzzzzzzzzzzers..."
I'm interested!
WmB
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>I wonder if it could take some gearing down without losing too much power,

You'll be better off using the miniature cellphone vibrator motor. http://www.robotroom.com/TinyMotor.html To remove the eccentric vibrator weight clamp the weight on a vise and punch out the motor shaft using a broken twist drill bit of the same diameter or nake a punch pin from piano wire. I got a pack of 10 vibrator motors for $10 from a surplus store. They never restocked them.
You can make your own battery pack that can fit inside the fuselage or engine nacelle. Use the blister pack the button cells came in. Roll three or more button cells (three cells needed for LED lights) inside a paper cylinder to form a battery pile. Leave the cylinder ends open. The molded plastic blister cup cut from the packaging is used as the end cap for the paper cylinder battery. Tape shut. If you want to solder the wire leads onto the battery be careful that you don't overheat the cell. The overheated chemicals can explode. It won't injure you but I wasn't happy breathing in the chemical fumes. Or otherwise use an elastic band to apply contact pressure on the wire leads.
If using AA or AAA cells leave them inside the blister pack. Melt holes in the blister plastic so that you can solder the wire leads onto the exposed cell anode and cathode. There, you have a neat home made battery pack for $1. Discard when the battery runs down.
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