Very OT: Anyone here work with power tools?

I have a Black and Decker circular saw, at least 15 or so years old. Can barely cut thru a 2x4 without smoking or burning the wood. I replaced the blade years back and don't remember
whether it was a name brand, etc. I'm a cheap bastard when it comes to replacing things...
Curious if its most likely a dull blade or if it was something to do with the old saw. Getting my list ready for Santa you know...
Craig
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if you're that cheap, sharpen the blade yourself and see. if the saw starts smoking, shut it off.
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Regarding power tools cheap is not always the better way to go.
That said, circular saw blades aren't that expensive given how long they last. If the electric motor is loosing power there should be a distinct difference in the sound it makes or the feeling of torque.
That said, the Lowes website has 7.25" corded saws starting at $30 but blades starting at about $5. And you can reuse the blade with the new saw if it tuns out the old saw is bad. Sears - saws start at about $40, blades about the same as Lowes.
Go to the store and tell the dude what you want to cut and he'll reccomend a blade. Most of the time I get lucky with guys at Lowes, Sears etc. and thier suggestions usually strike a balance between cost and utility.
Frank
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Could be a dull blade, especially if you tried to save money by buying the cheapest blade you could find. A blade with carbide-tipped teeth costs more but cuts better and lasts longer, saving money in the long run.
I've also seen smoking & burning when some fool (not me) had put the blade on backwards. (Look for an arrow on the body or safety guard showing which way the teeth should point.)
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: : Could be a dull blade, especially if you tried to save money by buying the : cheapest blade you could find. :     I wonder if blades today have more kerf than older blades? The wood commonly available today certainly seems wetter than I remember it being? : : I've also seen smoking & burning when some fool (not me) had put the blade on : backwards. (Look for an arrow on the body or safety guard showing which way the : teeth should point.) :     Fine tooth blade? I wouldn't think a general purpose blade would cut, but rather bounce the saw all about with the teeth rotating the wrong way around.
    Question for the OP - do you use a straight edge? I find I have a definite tendency to "twist" the saw once the frame leaves the far end of the wood, which puts the blade into a bind, and of course causes binding, burning, etc. A guild would definitely help eliminate that tendency.
                            Bruce
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"I like bad!" Bruce Burden Austin, TX.
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Musicman59 said the following on 24/11/2010 03:28:

A thought. Blades for cutting wood are best for wood! ;-)
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 19:28:38 -0800 (PST), Musicman59

If the motor can keep up the RPM, then most liley the blade is dull.
I kept wondering why my blade was going dull so fast on my 12" mitre saw. GOOD quality blade. After the 3rd sharpening, my wife mentioned that her mother had been coming over and using it to cut laminate flooring... ARGH!!!
Lamintate flooring finishes are spectacularly hard and require a special blade and a edge-on cut, ie slider, radial or table saw.
Sigh...
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 19:28:38 -0800 (PST), Musicman59

Possibly the blade needs the teeth pitch reset as well as sharpened. tThis means that each tooth is, in turn, tilted very slightly left or right, same as an ordinary hand saw. Without this, the cut is the same width as the blade material and the material being cut binds against the blade causing friction heating. If it has got very hot, then the blade may have lost it's tempering and not be worth resetting I am also cheap where I can be
Good Luck
Tony Chch NZ
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One other thing...did you put the blade on wiht the teeth pointed in the correct direction? R. Wink On Thu, 25 Nov 2010 06:05:20 +1300, Stadia

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