Best practice?

Hey guys,
What is the best practice for indicating grain direction on a polished
stainless steel part. I've been doing it by placing a dimension, hiding the
extension lines and changing the dim value to "GRAIN DIRECTION'. But I've
seen drawings from customers where they done a not with a leader on both
sides. I'm not clear on how they are doing this, can anyone explain it to
me? Or mayber even a better way to do this?
Thanks,
Wormsign
Reply to
WormSign
Loading thread data ...
"WormSign" wrote in news:Cgy7i.141247$_c5.10966@attbi_s22:
Your method sounds a little more robust, since it will be tied to the part geometry. To make a note with more thant one leader, you first create a note with one leader. ctrl+drag the arrow to make more leaders. You could also use a multi-jog leader with arrows on either end, plus a note, but that's more work. I don't think you'll do much better than your present method.
Reply to
Dale Dunn
What we do here is a text favorite "" that we load into the drawing and place on the part without a leader. We can then rotate it 90 degrees if we need to.
Reaper.
Reply to
Reaper2561
I'm in the office furniture industry; we specify grain direction on all wood parts by adding "GRAIN" to the over all length/width dimension that measures the same direction as the grain. For instance a desk top that is 72" long would have "Grain" added to the 72" dimension on the drawing; this can be at the end of the dim. or below the dim. This is fairly quick and clearly indicates direction. This should work as well for stainless steel.
Reply to
bitweaver
this sounds like you are identifying grain direction for a surface symbol. if this is true then you can use a lay symbol with the surface symbol. you can specify radial (modifier R), perpendicular to symbol (symbol _|_), angular cross pattern (symbol X), multi directional pattern (symbol M), circular lay (symbol C), parallel lay (symbol =), or a partuculate lay (basically a sand blast, symbol P). these are all modifiers in the surface symbol function.
Words of Wisdom (WoW): only when we are no longer afraid do we begin to live. iQ
Reply to
iQ
That really would confuse the guys in the shop. Remember these are the guys who come up and ask you what 3/16 is! When I tell them 3/16 is 3/16 they say what? I know they want to know the decimal equivalent but I still like to mess with them.
Thanks for your replies, I'm considering them but maybe the way we do it is a pretty good way. Wormsign
Reply to
WormSign
this sounds like you are identifying grain direction for a surface symbol. if this is true then you can use a lay symbol with the surface symbol. you can specify radial (modifier R), perpendicular to symbol (symbol _|_), angular cross pattern (symbol X), multi directional pattern (symbol M), circular lay (symbol C), parallel lay (symbol =), or a partuculate lay (basically a sand blast, symbol P). these are all modifiers in the surface symbol function.
Words of Wisdom (WoW): only when we are no longer afraid do we begin to live. iQ
Reply to
iQ
I vote for the method
To paraphrase Occams Razor - the principle pronounced by the English philosopher Willam of Occam "All things being equal the simplest solution is the correct one"
Reply to
Nev Williams
On your drawing sketch an arrow of some sort and then add a text note. Select it all and save in your company design library as a block. Then all you need to do is drag and drop the block into your drawings.
If you need to create two versions, one horizontal and one vertical note.
Regards,
Reply to
Anna Wood
"Anna Wood" a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
Made a block of a double sided arrow : , hor and vertical. Also made one with the "paper" (film) side, just in case the guy forgot that we draw "paper up".
Reply to
Jean Marc

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.