Rephrased question - anyone want to quote plastic parts?

I guess I sort of messed up in my earlier description. I'm talking
about producing at least 100,000 per year and maybe substantially more
than that. I'm also talking about at least 10 different injection
molded parts, some of which will be double quantities. That's why I
can't figure out why I can't get molders to respond. Seems to me they
should be jumping out of their skins to quote for us, but it just ain't
so.
Thanks,
'Sporky'
Reply to
Sporkman
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Usually, a company just doesn't pop out of nowhere needing that many parts without having a past history of vendors. You must already have prefered vendors.
Anyone else have a guess why no injection molders are interested?
Maybe you should write your request in Chinese? That's where are they are all made now! :)
Reply to
haulin79
Well, that's a good point, but this company is a bit of an exception all the way around. They DO have money, anyway. The product is potentially defense related, which is why they prefer American sources. Chinese mold MAKERS might be OK, but the parts need to be made in the US.
haul>
Reply to
Sporkman
Spork,
Sure had me goin there,,,
So you want class "A" tooling ?? Whats the projected product life ??
Product lifecycles are so short these days that alot of manufacturers are going to aluminum tooling for production. If you don't need millions of parts, it can be alot more cost effective. A million good parts from an aluminum tool isn't that hard to do, unless the material has alot of glass in it. Mostly it's in the way a molder handles the tool. You can't go digging a stuck part out with a screw driver for instance.
Most of the class "A" houses I know are out here. There's a couple in particular I can guarantee will quote your parts. It is a long way off though. Let me know if you're interested
Regards
Mark
Reply to
MM
Product life is easily three years, and maybe much more. There's nothing else that can compete with the product at the same level, and all the necessary patents are filed. I've read 'em . . . a company would be hard pressed to work around 'em without infringing. I'm sure there'll be improvements, but the highest quality tooling would stand a fair chance of exhausting its useful life before major rebuild.
'Sporky'
MM wrote:
Reply to
Sporkman
Yes, my thoughts were along these same lines. Ultimately, I think you are doing the right thing by trying to get referrals. Just dropping in out of nowhere with an RFQ probably isn't the way to go. For some reason, our business has always been difficult for `outsiders' to break into. Can't really explain why this is, but I have accumulated anecdotes similar to your experience over the years.
Another thing working against you is the fact that inventors are a scourge in our industry. Can't tell you how many guys with wood models in paper bags I have talked to over the years. All of that time was totally wasted. Anybody can invent a product, but it takes real skill to SELL it. Does your client have a distribution scheme in place? Expect to be asked that question.
To explain your first problem look at what you said: "Seems like they're just not interested in quantities of just a hundred or two thousand a year." I read it just like everybody else did ; 100-2000 per year.
Anyway, good luck.
jk
Reply to
jk
Interesting points, John, and I'm sure that might explain some of it. As it turns out, the company that owns the invention DOES have a distribution channel . . . and if I say any more they might get slightly pissed at me.
Reply to
Sporkman
Hi,
If you are still looking for names, contact Peter Lawrence at Sonolite Plastics, Gloucester, MA. 978-281-0664. These guys have been there for over 30 years, do all sorts of quantities (they make short run government stuff to millions of parts; they make douche and enema tip nozzles by the millions!). They also have an expert toolmaker by the name of Clayton Carncross, Simple Tool Company (978-281-0684). Clay is an exceptional tool maker. He's the go to guy when you want +0/-.0001 parts.
If you decide you can do this in China, let me know, I have a guy there that does beautiful tooling as well as great parts. Let me know and I can put you in contact.
Tell them Mike Tripoli sent you (I've known these guys for over 20 years, they'll take care of you).
Mike Tripoli
Reply to
Mike Tripoli
Sporky,
I didn't see your second post before I responded. Sonolite are your guys for sure. They have a ton of experience working with the government and government contractors. They know their "stuff" forwards and back. Call Peter today; if Peter is not available, call Clay Carncross. You would be very hard pressed to find two better companies for these things. I have used them to make cases for military power semiconductors in the past. THey'v emade everything from "microwave" radio domes to intelligent keys for high security (and don't forget, douche tips and enema nozzles by the millions!).
MT
Reply to
Mike Tripoli
Hell - I just want to know if enema tips and government work is only a coincidence or if there is something more sinister...
Reply to
CFisher
8~)
I was sorta wondering if the millions of tips are disposable or (perish the thought) being lost....
Reply to
Jeff Howard
I can recommend that you contact the following for quotes on tooling and production. TPI is located in Austin, TX. Jim is a good & honest guy that several of my clients have used in the past.
Jim Mueller Tech Plastics Inc / TPI Mfg. 512-577-2916 Cell
Reply to
John Eric Voltin
Thanks, Mike. I have several to contact now, but I WILL get in contact with Sonolite also.
Mike Tripoli wrote:
Reply to
Sporkman
The reason that not many are jumping out of their skins to quote your parts may be that they are unwilling to compete with Asian quotes, which usually run app. 20% of American quotes. G. De Angelis
Sporkman wrote:
Reply to
Guido De Angelis
Well, that's a GREAT way to remain competitive -- right? Just throw up your hands and give up . . .
BUT, by the way, this is not the true scenario. In many areas many American moldmakers and molders have increased their productivity so much that they are now competitive with Asian sources. And I don't believe for one minute that they wouldn't be ready to jump in if that were the only consideration. Anyway, thanks to this post I now have several sources actively working on quoting. It's still a mystery why others just never responded back. I'm thinking that poor organization on the part of some individuals means that some things just fall between the cracks, and poor computer skills and downright stupidity may account for the rest.
'Sporky'
Reply to
Sporkman

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