Building lighting

Is anyone aware of a source of LEDs that have a warm, yellowish color that
could be used as structure lights? It seems that this wolud provide an
extremely long life source with almost no heat.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Stanton
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"Jeff Stanton" wrote in news:jgP9l.17402$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe01.iad:
I got two from Litchfield Station for headlights that have a golden yellow hue. They were called (not surprisingly) Golden White LEDs. Unfortunately last time I looked they had changed the catalog number so I don't have one to pass it on.
There's also true white LEDs available, where you could add a yellow filter of some sort (amber marking light paint for model cars might work) and get the desired light color.
You might even want to mix the true white and golden white LEDs in a building to show a mix of incandescent and compact flourescent. The light color difference might not scale well...
Puckdropper
Reply to
Puckdropper
Jeff Stanton skriver:
Here in Denmark it is very popular to have a lot of light chains around your hose at christmas. At one of the hardwareshops they sold chains with 200 warm white LED's for 200 DKR (37 USD).
They give a very fine light and is cheap...
Klaus
Reply to
Klaus D. Mikkelsen
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If you find any LED to be to blue, try toning it down with Tamiya Clear Yellow or Clear Orange paint, or similar colored art marker.
Is anyone aware of a source of LEDs that have a warm, yellowish color that could be used as structure lights? It seems that this wolud provide an extremely long life source with almost no heat. Jeff
Reply to
Val
Take a white LED and put some yellow clearcoat over 9it. Either that or use a yellow plastic filter to bring out the yellow.
-- Bob May
rmay at nethere.com http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
Reply to
Bob May
I use the LEDs from Evans Designs.
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Their warm whites are quite realistic and are available for either DC or AC/DC. Resistors are already installed.
Their software isn't too shabby either. :>)
Reply to
Carl Heinz
Go to
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and search for "warm white led". You'll find warm colored LEDs from very small to high power ones.
Peteski
Reply to
Peter W.
Various people have mentioned model-railway-oriented suppliers who seem to do some quite reasonably priced pre-assembled kits with an LED and a series resistor and perhaps even a bridge rectifier.
But if you prefer to DIY, electronics suppliers will have various `warm white' LEDs. For example,
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at 45p+VAT each. You'd have to do the series resistor calculation yourself. (Farnell have a minimum order of L20 for ordinary credit card customers so that may not help you much unless you're an electronics freak.)
Reply to
Ian Jackson

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