Colors of classification lights...

Can anyone tell me what colors classification lights are? And which
colors go with which engine types?
Reply to
Frank Eva
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: Can anyone tell me what colors classification lights are? And which : colors go with which engine types? : -- : Frank Eva :
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Frank, There's a nice summary here: Class lights don't have anything to do with the type of engine, just the situation...
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Reply to
KTØT
Thanks for the URL!
Reply to
Frank Eva
White is to show that the train is an extra, that is, it is a train that is not listed in the timetable.
Green is to indicate that the train is a regularly scheduled one that is running in more than one part, or sections. All sections operate on the time published in the timetable for that train. That is, every section is due at the same place at the same time. Of course, that can't happen, so any train meeting a superior train displaying green class lights must wait until all sections of that train have passed. On trains running in sections, all but the last section will display green lights.
RED, if present, is not a classification light, but rather a marker light to indicate that the locomotive is the end of the train. Red marker lights may be seen on light engine movements without a caboose or, sometimes, on helper or pusher engines.
Recently, several manufacturers offered "Working" class lights that illuminated green when the locomotive was going forward and changed to red when the locomotive was reversed. This was most emphatically NOT prototype practice anywhere in North America and is purely "Toy Train".
Incedentally, the rules specify that in addition to lights, flags of the proper color be displayed as well. Two of each are required, but the presence of one shall be the same meaning as two.
Reply to
Froggy
Let's not forget modern commuter locomotives. GO Transit (Gov't of Ontraio) runs F40PH-2's in push-pull service. When the Cab-car is leading, the unit doing the pushing from behind displays 'RED' class lights as well.
Reply to
Drew Bunn
DING DING
Except that in this condition it is displaying end of train marker lights and not classification lights. Even though it is using the same lights, the usage is different.
In the real world there is a difference.
Reply to
Howard R Garner
It is a common error to confuse the terms "class light" and "marker light" Almost everyone is guilty of doing it at one time or another.
Class lights have only three possible conditions: OFF GREEN WHITE
When red is displayed as in the Canadian example cited above, they are marker lights and indicate the rear end of the train. It was an ingenious bit of engineering, but confuses many railfans.
Reply to
Froggy
So, 'RED' or End Of Train (or even FRED - Flashing Rear End Device) isn't considered a 'class'?
_______________________________________________________ Drew Bunn Ainsley Specialized Transport Toronto, Ontario Canada bunn snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com
Reply to
Drew Bunn
Class lights have only three possible conditions:
OFF (Scheduled Train) GREEN (Section following) (all sections of a train BUT the LAST section will display green class lamps) WHITE (Extra Train)
Marker lights:
RED (End of train) GREEN (End of train in the clear on siding) (they do some things with one red and one green marker for in the clear in multiple track areas)
-Hudson
Reply to
Hudson Leighton
"Hudson Leighton"
Just to make it perfectly clear, the last section's classification lights are "OFF" because this isn't a section, it's the regular train. At least as far as the timetable is concerned.
Many, some, model railroaders think that sections carry white classification lights.
-- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway
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Reply to
Roger T.
considered a 'class'?<
No. Class lights determine sections, or extras. In my time era a engine with no class lights was the regular scheduled train. If it had a white light it was running extra (usually freights). If it had a green light it meant additional sections were following (usually passenger trains with additional sections following).
Reply to
Jon Miller
classification lights.<
The problem with models is that's it's hard to change the lights. So I usually model my freight engines with white lights (meaning most freights are run extra) and mix up the passenger engines with none and green.
Reply to
Jon Miller
It's one of those areas where compromises must be made. In our operating group we do not have fully functional class lights on the locomotives. We do, however, run extras and sections when needed. Instead of lights we use flags. Of course, since a model railway is not usually operated in the dark (don't laugh, one of our group does operate in the dark) flags do the job nicely. There are whistle signals that are mandated for a train running in sections to use to communicate that fact to all trains it meets; one "long" and two "shorts". The train being notified is required to answer in kind. I know that, but I have never told any of the guys who use "sound" about it. When you have a train running in three sections that meets two extras and three regularly scheduled trains it would be Bedlam on a model railway.
Reply to
Froggy
Of course, if a given model railroader is really clueless about operating practices, rules, etc., then he's REALLY "operating in the dark." :-)
Dieter Zakas
Reply to
Hzakas
Uhmmmmm...yeah, as is most often the case IME. Of course, I meant literally in the dark, as in with the lights out. One of our group has twenty-four hour lighting in his railroad room and when its nighttime, it's really nighttime. The lights are out and there's only a very faint blue-white "sort-of" light from the ceiling. It's only enough to allow you to move around without being totally blind. Here are lights in the yards as per the prototype, but you can't see enough to work without a flashlight. The flashlight has to be approved by the layout owner, which means that it is very dim; just barely enough light to read car numbers and see turnouts.
Reply to
Froggy
Froggy,
I understood what you meant the first time around.
Of course, "in the dark" also has another meaning, as I, uh, "illuminated."
Dieter Zakas
Reply to
Hzakas
Yeah, OK. We are on the same wavelength What is amusing is to observe someone who is in the dark operating in the dark.
Amusing to ME anyway.
..................F> de Sade, Ga.
Reply to
Froggy
ROFL!
Dieter Zakas
Reply to
Hzakas

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