DCC recommendation ?



Don't worry terry is a knob jockey end of story.Nice modeling Mark, they URL worked first go for me too.
Ive seen his watefall layout what garbage.
Nathan
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mark_newton wrote:

Nothing but a small diorama, posted recently, simply shows your claims in the past were lies. So you have now something to show that includes 2 turnouts, which look like thy belongs to a UK 00 layout.

Get a reality check, wood does not weather to a brown colour expert.

Still not one picture of a weathered locomotive expert

And you think you are an expert after being shamed into building a turnout or 2. A couple of months experience, yep, your an expert, especially if you a stupid enough to choose the sloppy NMRA standard to work to. What sort of track gauge did you use? probably the NMRA check gauge.

Yet you don't know how to do a realistic colour for weathered wood, can't show us a weathered locomotive and have recently built 2 turnouts scratch built to sloppy dimensions. These turnout are clearly for show, no evidence of anything running over them, no scratched paint on the wing rails. Your the last person I will ask unless I'm interested in building a dolls house on a flat board with a removable roof or a dunny on a locomotive tender.
Terry Flynn
http://angelfire.com/clone/rail/index.html
HO wagon weight and locomotive tractive effort estimates
DC control circuit diagrams
HO scale track and wheel standards
Any scale track standard and wheel spread sheet
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Terry Flynn wrote:

Do you have a problem with comprehension??? Of course Ring used a guage.

You truly are one nasty piece of work. Here you are, you accuse other people of being spitefull and nasty but yet so seem to be quite an expert at it. I often wondered have you been approached to perfom your humiliation act at hellfire.
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Greg Rudd wrote:
> Terry Flynn wrote:
>> And you think you are an expert after being shamed into building a >> turnout or 2. A couple of months experience, yep, your an expert, >> especially if you a stupid enough to choose the sloppy NMRA >> standard to work to. What sort of track gauge did you use? probably >> the NMRA check gauge. >> > Do you have a problem with comprehension???
Yes Greg, he does. He also has a problem with anyone who is a better modeller than he is.
> Of course Ring used a gauge.
Perhaps I should use a 12 gauge instead?
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an expert after being shamed into building a

Please do. Its very funny, Terry gets upset when we have a go at him and yet its ok to do it to others I cant see a thing wrong with your diarama mark well done, and for terry all I can say is Pot Kettle Black, I suggest Terry goes back to the Hellfire club to get his humilitation fix
Terry, if you can't have anything constructive or nice to say, dont f-ing say it at all wanker.
Nathan
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glenfield_signaller wrote:

Yes, nice diorama, except that it is a diorama and therefore provides not the slightest evidence that mark can scratchbuild functional switches using the NMRA gauge, and Flynn is right, the wood only looks realistic for freshly laid, untreated ties. I don't understand the black and red ballast, either, but that's probably because he is modeling a prototype with which I am unfamiliar.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:
> Yes, nice diorama, except that it is a diorama
It's a module. It connects to other modules.
> and therefore provides not the slightest evidence that mark can > scratchbuild functional switches using the NMRA gauge,
You're joking, surely? You reckon I'd go to all the trouble of making *non-functional* turnouts?
> and Flynn is right, the wood only looks realistic for freshly laid, > untreated ties.
Which is what they're meant to represent.
> I don't understand the black and red ballast, either, but that's > probably because he is modeling a prototype with which I am > unfamiliar.
The red is rust staining from the rails and fastenings. The black around the turnouts is oil staining from where the turnouts are lubricated. Get out and have a look at real track anywhere - it's not just on my prototype where this is evident.
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mark_newton wrote:

Okay then, please accept my apology. So the track *is* used then.

I don't see why you would make them functional for a diorama; it contradicts the purpose of a diorama since most functional model switches don't look as real as they could if they were non-functional (unless you're building to some finescale standard) and even if they were functional, they couldn't be used. If it's a module, though, and you've connected up the module and the switches work dependably, that's good enough for me.

Well, you succeeded.

I've never seen anything like that. I mean, really, those colors seem like they're off a checkerboard, but it could just be my monitor, or the picture lighting. It is interesting how those newly laid ties got all that rusty and oily ballast on top of them, though.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:
> I've never seen anything like that.
I don't ask this to be narky, but how much prototype track have you seen? I've seen track on the Dao line in Portugal that had neat and well-defined alternating bands of light and dark ballast, each about 30 feet in length. I couldn't find anyone who could explain that!
Bear in mind that I'm trying as much as possible to only model things that I've actually seen for myself, I'm not just making it up as I go along... :-)
> I mean, really, those colors seem like they're off a checkerboard, > but it could just be my monitor, or the picture lighting.
That's probably the case. The effect on the actual modules is not that pronounced.
> It is interesting how those newly laid ties got all that rusty and > oily ballast on top of them, though.
As far as I'm aware, there is no ballast on top of the sleepers on my modules. I went to some trouble to keep the ballast below the tops.
But having said that, it's not at all unusual to see replacement sleepers with old or weathered ballast around them. Ever seen a per-way gang re-sleepering, as opposed to relaying? I've watched blokes remove the spikes, dig the ballast away from the end of the sleeper with a pelican pick, remove the old sleeper, put in a new one, all the while barely disturbing the surrounding ballast. They do it in Japan, and we do it here in Australia, so I'd hazard a guess and say it's done that way elsewhere, too.
All the best,
Mark.
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Yeah they do that in Canada as well. And touch up ballast often does not match old ballast and new ties are interspersed with old ties. I've seen track with similar weathering to what you've created but in a variety of different colors.
Here's a weathering effect that you might find interesting: lightly sprinkle raw sawdust along the tracks and you would be simulating the wood chips found along the CP Rail mainline in northern Ontario. Wood chips are often blown out of the tops of chip gondolas and there's a lot of that traffic near Marathon Ontario.
Jb
wrote:

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J Barnstorf wrote:
> Yeah they do that in Canada as well. And touch up ballast often does > not match old ballast and new ties are interspersed with old ties. > I've seen track with similar weathering to what you've created but in > a variety of different colors. > > Here's a weathering effect that you might find interesting: lightly > sprinkle raw sawdust along the tracks and you would be simulating the > wood chips found along the CP Rail mainline in northern Ontario. Wood > chips are often blown out of the tops of chip gondolas and there's a > lot of that traffic near Marathon Ontario.
That's interesting all right, Jb. I take it the chips are small and lightweight, and the gondolas have no covers, roofd or the like?
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Yes that's correct. The trains go through town around 40-60 kmh. and along the lake sometimes there is quite the wind. The chips are around 1"x1"1/4" and the car looks like this http://jbrail.railfan.net/FreightCars/Gondolas/CP343449.html

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J Barnstorf wrote:
> Yes that's correct. The trains go through town around 40-60 kmh. and > along the lake sometimes there is quite the wind. The chips are > around 1"x1"1/4" and the car looks like this > http://jbrail.railfan.net/FreightCars/Gondolas/CP343449.html
Great photo, thanks J! That's a *BIG* gon!
But I suppose that woodchips would be a low-density lading, and the loaded of the car would not be that great?
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Yes the wood chips are low density. car capy Ld Lmt 151500.

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mark_newton wrote: [...] Ever seen a per-way

They use a machine to do that hereabouts.
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Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:
> mark_newton wrote:
>> [...] Ever seen a per-way gang re-sleepering, as opposed to >> relaying? I've watched blokes remove the spikes, dig the ballast >> away from the end of the sleeper with a pelican pick, remove the >> old sleeper, put in a new one, all the while barely disturbing the >> surrounding ballast. They do it in Japan, and we do it here in >> Australia, so I'd hazard a guess and say it's done that way >> elsewhere, too. > > They use a machine to do that hereabouts.
Yes, we have those too - made by Kershaw IIRC. Very useful for production re-sleepering, but as they're on-track machines they require possession. A small gang of blokes doing it manually can work between trains, as traffic permits.
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Terry.....i've always respected your opinions as to the NMRA...not always agreed with them but respected them...but you're rudeness in this thread is outrageous IMHO....so you've just been put in the ignore list..bye-bye! Gene

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ANOTHER new e-mail address? Wassamatta, lose another account?
Your the last person I will ask unless I'm interested in

Well, dunnys (or more exactly, their contents) would be the only thing I'd expect you to be an expert on...
Back in the dunny with you...
<<plonk>>
<<flush>>
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NSWGR wrote:
Spin and stupidity in equal measure.
> Nothing but a small diorama,
It's a module. It connects to other modules. If you can't distinguish the difference between the two, consult your beloved dictionary. More spin...
> posted recently,
It's irrelevant whether it was posted yesterday or ten years ago. You continually claim that your detractors comments have no authority without a web page to back them up, so I obliged by showing some of my work. More desperate spin from you, particularly as you claimed the URL didn't work. More lies.
> simply shows your claims in the past were lies.
Does it? How?
> So you have now something to show that includes 2 turnouts, which > look like thy belongs to a UK 00 layout.
Really? Shows how little you know about UK OO layouts. It also shows that you lied yet again when you claimed I haven't built turnouts. More desperate spin from you...
> Get a reality check, wood does not weather to a brown colour expert.
I know your powers of observation are terribly limited, but try to go outside and look around. Wood weathers to any number of colours, from black to white, and anything in between. Are you referring to the brown painted/stained stained structures, or the sleepers? I've lost count of the number of brown wooden buildings I've seen or photographed in Japan. Many Japanese minor railways use untreated wooden sleepers, which start off a rich brown colour. You want to argue otherwise, show your proof. More desperate spin from you...
> Still not one picture of a weathered locomotive expert
Irrelevant. But when it's convenient for me, I'll post some. And you know I will, just to spite you. Better prepare some more spin...
When are you going to post some photos of *your* weathered locos? And by weathered, I don't mean the ones covered in dust and bird droppings.
> And you think you are an expert after being shamed into building a > turnout or 2.
Shamed? Who, by you? LOL! Get your hand off it, Flynn. You're not an influence on my modelling.
> A couple of months experience, yep, your an expert,
If I'm capable of doing all this in a couple of months, then I certainly am an expert. Thanks for the compliment.
> especially if you a stupid enough to choose the sloppy NMRA standard > to work to. What sort of track gauge did you use? probably the NMRA > check gauge.
Yes, that and a couple of roller gauges I machined up on the lathe. They worked really well, too. You should try it sometime.
> Yet you don't know how to do a realistic colour for weathered wood,
As noted above, the colour is correct for the prototypes being modelled. If you reckon you can prove otherwise, be my guest. Flights to Japan from Sydney are cheap at the moment. That ought to appeal to you.
> can't show us a weathered locomotive
Stay tuned.
> and have recently built 2 turnouts scratch built to sloppy > dimensions.
Quite a few more than two, and they all work fine with their sloppy dimensions, thanks.
> These turnout are clearly for show, no evidence of anything running > over them, no scratched paint on the wing rails.
Why would there be scratched paint? They're gun-blued. There's no paint to scratch off. That's the way experts do it. Experts also know that the wheel doesn't run on the check or wing rail. If yours do, you need to work on them some more.
> Your the last person I will ask unless I'm interested in building a > dolls house
First doll's house I've ever seen with an inspection pit and workbenches. Fitter's house, more like. But if you'd like some advice on building doll-houses, ask me. My niece loves the one I built for her.
Why not show us some photos of your structures? Let's see how well-detailed and finished yours are. After all, you can't post opinions without a web-page to back them up, can you?
> on a flat board
My prototype is flat. Is that too difficult a concept for you to grasp?
> or a dunny on a locomotive tender.
Yes, my expertly-scratchbuilt doghouse. Do show us some photo of the locos you've re-worked to be more accurate representaions of their prototypes. I'm sure that you have many excellent examples - not!
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mark_newton wrote:

Your photo is cropped in a way that makes the difference almost impossible to distinguish.

The URL *doesn't* work if you're using a browser-based usenet client. It gives you an error message about "direct linking not allowed". Probably is not a problem with other types of usenet readers, and it works if you copy and paste the link into a browser URL box. If you don't believe me, just go to Google groups, open this thread and try clicking on your URL.
Calling this fact "desperate spin" is a little over the top.
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