Dust Removal

Can you please suggest a reliable and safe method of removing dust from an HO scale train car. My display models need a dusting. I was curious if
anyone has used those cans of compressed air that people use to clean out their computer keyboards. If so, where do you buy that can?
Thanks! Matt
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You answered your question in your question. A can of compressed air for cleaning computer keyboards can be purchased anywhere that sells computers and more <g>.
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Matt Brennan wrote:

I use an old camera cleaning brush that has a rubber bulb to puff air - I bought it in the mid-1970s but I assume they are still sold.
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I don't know where you live, but here in Australalia, I find the cans a lot cheaper in variety department stores than computer shops. Check out the stationary section where they sell discs etc.
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Do the cans of compressed air bring a brand new car back to brand new? There's a decent coating of dust. Or, do I need to do something extra? The cars I have on display were new. I am hoping to re-capture their new-in-box paint work.
Thoughts?
Thanks! Matt
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Matt Brennan spake thus:

You'll probably need to brush the cars in addition to blowing them off, since not all of the dust will vamoose in the wind. And you might even have to do some careful washing, with dilute soap & water and whatever implement works, like a Q-tip, small clean cloth, toilet paper square, etc., to get off any accumulated grime.
By the way, my favorite device for blowing off dust is my airbrush compressor, but I'm guessing you don't have one of these.
--
... asked to comment on Michigan governor George Romney's remark that
the army had "brainwashed" him in Vietnam-a remark which knocked Romney
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Unfortunately not. I'd sure like one. Thanks David. I will combine the compressed air with your suggestions.
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But you probably have a vacuum cleaner. The very clear, dry air from those expensive computer cans is not necessary for dislodging dust from displayed models. You can do just as well with by connecting the vacuum hose to the discharge hole provided on most vacuum cleaners. The unaltered volume is more than you want, but many vacuum hoses have an adjustable opening to divert excess flow. And you want some sort of nozzle to better direct the flow. It'll be a whole lot less as expensive and just as effective. Geezer
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Geezer spake thus:

Most excellent idea, that. Forget those cans. What a guy could do is make an adapter to a smaller piece of tubing, which would limit the airflow somewhat.
I vacuum up and recover loose ballast using a piece of tubing and a filter made out of cardboard tubes and a piece of nylon stocking. Same thing you want in reverse.
--
... asked to comment on Michigan governor George Romney's remark that
the army had "brainwashed" him in Vietnam-a remark which knocked Romney
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I use a feather duster. Does the "dust" have grease in it? What are the cars made of?
Jim Stewart
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We keep a can of compressed air for keeping the keyboard -- and similar stuff -- clean. My wife gets it from Office Depot (she may actually have a bigger addiction to Office Depot than I have at Walthers). It works great to keep my small car fleet dust-free -- I think it was Model Railroader magazine which recommended using a vacuum cleaner in conjunction with the compressed air to suck the dust away as it gets blown off the models.
The cans come with a thin "straw" which can be attached to the nozzle to direct the spray, similar to what cans of WD-40 have -- I've found the straw to be more than adequate for getting a concentrated blast of air into the model to clean the roofwalks, stirrups, etc.
The product number on the can I have here next to the PC is Office Depot #643-923.
--
Mark



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I am glad that I asked about this. Thanks to everyone for the suggestions. I like the idea of combining the compressed air with a modified vacuum cleaner. The dust should be dry and grease free. I'll plan to attempt this cleaning later this month.
Many Thanks!
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On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 10:43:02 GMT, Matt Brennan wrote:

Except that blows it around, stirring up dust just like one of those damn leaf blowers. Lots of sources (Micro Mark for one, if I remember correctly) sell relatively inexpensive sets of small hose and nozzles, including brush nozzles, along with a bleed off adaptor to reduce the vacuum force. It might be a good idea to adapt one of those really soft brush camera tools to such a set of tools.
--
Steve

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The H-0 club I belong to uses one of these, it works well. I also do not see the purpose of blowing dust around to settle somewhere else. Roger Aultman
Steve Caple wrote:

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Matt,
A very good, soft brush I use with good results is a makeup "dusting" brush used by women, and available at chain stores or anywhere that sells makeup and supplies. If I recall they may also come in a couple different sizes.
I got "turned on" to this item when I was working at a local TV station a few years back. The engineer at the station had his assistant use one of these now and then to dust off the face of various pieces of electronic equipment. Worked like a charm and didn't move any knobs, sliders, etc. from their settings. It simply went around these things and just removed the dust. On your models it is the friendliest way I've found to dust around a model's delicate details without breaking them off. I've since been using one to also dust my electronic equipment at home, the glass on my lighted magnifier and my models.
Many times I have needed to dust something delicate around the house or even the front dashboard controls and heater/fresh air vents in the car, and the "girlie" brush always shines.
"Paul - The CB&Q Guy" (Modeling 1960's In HO.)
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Hi Paul,

My wife said that she will pick one up for me. Great suggestion!
Thanks!
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