End of track bumpers

Here in the UK, because we has loose coupled wagons from historic times, each wagon had pneumatic bumpers (buffers). At the end of each
track in a good yard, there would be equivalent buffers to match the buffers on each wagon and loco.
I have been modelling US outline for about 50 years but never understood what you put at the end of freight yard or loco sidings. A central bumper would destroy the knuckle coupler.
Can anyone tell me what I put at the end of tracks?
Liks to photos - real ir model, would be good.
David
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On 2011-01-16 23:24:09 +0000, David Pennington said:

Translation
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google images: end of track bumpers
Both model and actual show up. Didn't see any UK on 1st page but you already know what they look like.
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In the UK bumpers are called "Buffer Stops", try that in Google.
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On 2011-01-17 04:30:05 +0000, Roger Traviss said:

I model US outline - I know about the UK! David
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 18:47:10 +0000, David Pennington

If you look at LGB spares, they're called "tampons"!
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There are lots of options!
There are several types of purpose-made steel coupler bumpers such as these:
http://www.telusplanet.net/public/crowley/Helpful_hints/TrackBumbers/End.JPG
http://www.trainboard.com/railimages/data/525/bumper2.jpg
http://www.fiferhobby.com/assets/images/SL-340.jpg
There are also a number of wheel-stop style bumpers like this:
http://needtrains.com/images/81-803.gif
http://www.westernsafety.com/wch-railroadproducts/WCHpg19-1-WheelStops.jpg
http://media.photobucket.com/image/hayes%20wheel%20stops/jereising/Scenery%20I/t100529_0000.jpg
Yet again, there are the old-fashioned big-pile-of-dirt-and/or-a- couple-of-boards stops:
http://jbrr.com/Pics/Bumpers/Wood_Bumping_Post.jpg
http://web4.hobbylinc.com/gr/mrs/mrs8.jpg
In my town there is a siding that ends at the base of a rather sturdy 4' diameter palm tree (No pictures. Sorry.)
And lastly, there's the Los Angeles Union Station option:
http://www.larhf.org/images/store/storeswan225.jpg
(Note for future reference: Google Images is your friend.)
~Pete
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On 1/16/2011 4:00 PM Twibil spake thus:

Pity you don't have a larger size of that one! (Looks like what, an Alco? locomotive sticking half off an overpass.)
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To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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Happened at the Los Angeles Union Station.
"The Flying F3 On Sunday, January 25, 1948 at approximately 8:45AM, this Santa Fe diesel locomotive, pulling the combined Super Chief and El Capitan from Chicago, was involved in this incredible accident. The lead locomotive, number 19, crashed through the "end-of-track" bumper, across a roadway, climbed the curbing, and crashed through a concrete wall, hanging over Aliso Street approximately 20 feet below."
That same wall now overlooks the north side of the 101 Freeway as it passes through downtown L.A. just east of the civic center, and if you look closely you can still see where the wall was repaired after the "oops".
This web page tells a more complete version of the story.
http://harrymarnell.net/laupt.htm
~Pete
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On 1/16/2011 10:55 PM Twibil spake thus:

Hey, thanks. That certainly satisfies the craving for destruction, at least temporarily: the last good train wreck I saw was in "The Fugitive".
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To me, the *plonk...* reminds me of the old man at the public hearing
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Have you read Clive Cussler's book "The Wrecker"?
It's supposedly based on a factual story about a guy who single- handedly tried to ruin the Southern Pacific, but I can't give you a review: I find Cussler's writing rather turgid, and I couldn't wade through more than the first chapter.
~Pete
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It's supposedly based on a factual story about a guy who single- handedly tried to ruin the Southern Pacific, but I can't give you a review: I find Cussler's writing rather turgid, and I couldn't wade through more than the first chapter.
----------------------------------
Rather like his "Sea Hunters" TV show?
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On 2011-01-17 00:00:44 +0000, Twibil said:

http://media.photobucket.com/image/hayes%20wheel%20stops/jereising/Scenery%20I/t100529_0000.jpg
Yet

OK, let's be clear - I am the original poster. I am modelling a US Shortline circa 1945-46 - modelled on the Tweetsie but not narrow gauge. I presume that they may have gone for big - pile of dirt- but I hoped for some US input on this from a discussion - what would they use - rather than - look it up in Google.
If we all looked eveything up on google there would be no need for newsgroups !
David
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On 18/01/2011 1:47 PM, David Pennington wrote: [...]

The only way to know for sure is to find some photos showing stub tracks on the Tweetsie. The Tweetsie, being a shortline and chronically short of funds, probably use the Hayes wheel stops, the pile' o' dirt, the ties jammed under the opposing rail, and possibly the box-built-of-ties with dirt in it. All cheap. And all except the wheel stops easy to make out of whatever was handy. You won't go wrong is you do the same. ;-)
HTH Wolf K.
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On 2011-01-18 22:01:48 +0000, Wolf K said:

Thanks that makes it clear ad easy David
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I typed a complete list of the various types of wheels stops used in NORTH AMERICA, not just the "U.S.". Perhaps you should go back through this thread and read it again?
The Google reference was to someone who I thought didn't know that "bumpers" in the UK are known as " "buffer stops". That was what the reference to Google was for, so they could see what a "buffer stop" was.
DOH!
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Seems to be some confusion here over who said to Google what.
Seems two of us referred this list to Google. Me to see what a UK buffer stop looked like and another helpful soul who said to "Google images: end of track bumpers".
I see you did read my list after all.
I apologise if I leapt to the wrong conclusion over the Google posts.
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wrote:

Perhaps if you had stated that to begin with, the responses may have been more to your liking. Your post suggested you would like links to photos of real or model. No quicker or mor inclusive way to get that than google. If you want to talk about why this or that was used, you need to know what this and that are.

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A bumper that the knuckle bumps against, or wheel stops, or a tie (sleeper) 'U' bolted to the top of the rail rails using two treaded rods and washers and nuts per threaded rod, or two ties placed like an 'X', one end of one tie jammed under one rail and the other resting on top of the other rail, ditto for the other tie in the shape of a 'X' or, a pile of earth or nothing at all. Take your pick.
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