Favorite cleaners and lubes

On 1/1/2008 11:02 PM P. Roehling spake thus:


Hmm; very nice m.o.p. inlay there. I never did anything as fancy as that.

Nothing anymore. Last played with an Eastern European/Balkan band here in the Bay Area (bass, violin, tambura). Before that, played in orchestras (violin, in community symphony & chamber groups); got to play lots of times at Stanford's MemChu with choral groups.
Also played old-timey, bluegrass and Irish in a previous lifetime. (I especially liked the Round Peak style--you know, Tommy Jarrell, Fred Cockerham, Fuzzy Mountain String Band and those folks).
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Thank you. But if you've done any at all, you're *way* ahead of most people who style themselves luthiers.

Tsk!
Hmm. Did you ever know Erika Aschmann? She was into that scene when she lived in the Bay Area. (And do you know the tuning joke about the Balkan guitarist?)

Huh. We'll have to meet if we should ever end up in a similar neighborhood.
I used to play with "The bound To Frail String Band" here in So Cal, I've won the Clawhammer category at the Topanga Contest a couple of times, and I cooked up a "Bold-Timey" Clawhammer style where I combine a traditional clawhammer right hand with a jazz guitar style left hand; enabling one to play all *sorts* of unconventional material on the 5-string. ("Satin Doll", "Well You Needn't", "Sh'Beg-Sh'More", "Oh, What A Beautiful Morning", Etc.)
My current band is yclept "Felonious Plunk".
Pete
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Are fingerboards unfinished wood?
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On 1/2/2008 12:21 AM Mark Mathu spake thus:

Yes, except on some electric instruments (like Fender maple fingerboards), which are lacquered (and which look reeeeeally bad when the finish wears off as it always does). Usually either ebony (the best stuff), rosewood or similar. (Or maple painted black on cheapie guitars.)
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Usually.
Fender -and a few others- finish their maple boards to keep the finger crud from building up in the grain and making the guitar look ugly*, but rosewood and ebony are almost never finished.
*BTW: This only works until your fingertips rub off the finish. Oddly enough, old Fender guitars with ugly, dirty, worn-out fingerboards are now a status symbol among guitarists! Who knew?
Pete
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That's what they said, without qualification. They qualified two types of plastic but, no qualifications for wood.

If it's made out of wood they sure did. No qualifications on wood, just like you quoted them to start with.
Paul
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the best way is for someone to place their prized plastic engine shell in WD-40 for months an report back to us later...
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On Wed, 02 Jan 2008 08:27:39 GMT, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Is that your hand I see held high in the air? -- Ray
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hehehe... might be. I have a few Front Range GP-7's that are my favs...
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On 1/3/2008 12:44 PM Big Rich Soprano spake thus:

All in the name of Science, of course ...
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oh of course hehehe...
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On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 17:33:13 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Taking no position on the WD-40 issue, allow me to put forward paraffin wax as a superior chain lube. Clean chain (brush in solvent or turps, or use soap or citrus cleaner, then spray with WD-40 for its water displacement effect). Melt wax, immerse cleaned chain in wax; agitate moving links around to ensure max penetration. Remove and hang to cool. Flex chain back and forth to drop excess wax; reinstall.
The wax lubes just fine (and a lot more than the minuscule amounts of oils in WD-40 does) and does not tend to pick up dust and grime as much as oily or greasy chain lubes do. Some folks mix teflon into the wax.
--
Steve

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On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 17:33:13 -0800, David Nebenzahl

WD-40 is a water displacer/penetrating oil (hence the "WD") and is approximately only 4% lubricant. The best place for WD-40 is in a plumber's toolbox.
As the former owner of a bicycle shop I have had to replace many a destroyed drive chain that had been "lubricated" with WD-40. For bicycle chains its best use is as a cleaner; flood the chain, wipe the excess and let the rest evaporate. Then use a good chain lube. My favorite bike chain lube is heavy-duty air tool oil. Any lubricant on the outside of the chain, where all it does is pick up dirt, should be removed with a clean, disposable rag.
I have had good success lubricating model train engines with tiny amounts of light air tool oil and synthetic bicycle grease.
Texas Pete
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Bingo.
Thank you, Pete.
Pete -also.
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P. Roehling wrote:

I can live with that. :-) BTW, never use WD-40 on an antique clock. It really won't damage it, but it certainly won't make it run either.
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Given what we've read over the past few days, I think I can stand by what I wrote in the first place.
"NEVER use WD40 on anything to do with model railroading."
"It is NOT plastic compatable and isn't a lubricant."
"W" = Water "D" = Displacement "40" = The 40th try at development?
I'm a technical director of a small theatre and I use WD40 to clean residue from electrical and audio cables that have been taped to the floor with gaff tape. It's an excellent cleaner for that kind of work but as a lubricant? Well, it isn't.
-- Happy New Year
Roger T. Home of the Great Eastern Railway at:- http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra / Latitude: 48 25' North Longitude: 123 21' West
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Anthony Fremont wrote:

<snip>
Wow, I didn't mean to stir up a hornets nest. ;-) Thanks for the replies everyone. Glad to know that naphtha shouldn't hurt anything. I still want to test it on the little rubber pieces found in some models to be sure.
After running the engines around, I'm not sure that the watch barrel grease is really the right thing. I don't think it's hurting anything, but I also don't think that it's really doing an ideal job. I'm going to get some teflon based lube and try that out.
Thanks again all :-)
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