Foamboard update...

On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 15:48:48 GMT, Ken Day wrote:

Is that like an 0-5-0 and a 3-5?
--
Steve

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On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 09:26:44 -0700, Steve Caple

Dang it ! You got me ! But then again , how would YOU know :-)
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In a message on Fri, 07 Apr 2006 21:35:36 GMT, wrote :
"> "> >Not to mention the actual price would probably be about $300 a sheet, "> >and it would be "Out of Stock- Expected in 14 Days" for 11 months a "> >year! "> "> I'm getting in late here, but where is blue/pink foamboard "> supposedly unobtainable?
The southern parts of the US generally. Places were it does not get cold enough most of the time for people to worry about stuff freezing in basements. The blue/pink foamboard is *commonly* used up here in New England as insulation on the outside of poured concrete basements/foundations. One can just stick it on and back fill against it.
">
">
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 Deepwoods Software -- Linux Installation and Administration http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Web Hosting, with CGI and Database snipped-for-privacy@deepsoft.com -- Contract Programming: C/C++, Tcl/Tk
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 03:05:13 +0200, Robert Heller

When I lived in the Dallas area, I did some searching and found several HVAC contractors that were listed with 3M as dealers. Home Despot will order it if they don't stock it in the local store. They stock it in St Louis @ ~$25/4'x8'x2".
fl@liner

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This a response to several specific posts but I also thank all others who replied.
Robert Heller said:
~snip~

Well, you've got me there: the weight of plywood would indeed defeat the benefit of a light weight foam-only base. From that angle it might be better to glue the road bed and track to plywood -except I like the thought of how easy it would be to poke holes in the foam to glue in trees and possibly carve a creek bed in. I'll have to take this into consideration but I doubt I'll go 'old school' with the hills and such. I think at least in that area I could get away with white foam.
Fl@liner said:

Good idea. I hadn't thought about special orders. I checked this out yesterday at both Home Depot and Lowes. Results are sketchy: both places said that they can't get anything from warehouses from central or eastern states. Depot didn't seem to be interested in the thought of only buying one or two sheets. Lowes was more helpful but I'll have to check in during a weekday (I guess the person who does this type of special order is off weekends) to know if a warehouse in northern CA might have it and what a minimum purchase would be. So, I'll know something this week.
Bill said:
~snip~

Lol! If you've enough good stories you could probably write a book and make a nice profit. Vintage or traditional Halloween is growing in popularity and lots of folks enjoy hearing about how it used to be. It's sort of a backlash to the look of so much of modern Halloween which tends to either be too cutesy or all blood and gore with some demonic imagery mixed in. I'm in my 40's now and can see how much better the holiday was when I was a kid.

Thanks. If I end up using bead board I plan to experiment with a piece before actually using any for the layout. Different cutting methods and such. What sticks to it and what doesn't. I did find a piece that came in a shipping box at work and tested it for fire resistance. Using a micro torch I couldn't get it to catch fire. Interestingly, the fire applied gently causes it, not to melt, burn or turn black, but to shrink away. I'll need a bigger piece to test further but it looks like with a little practice that rocky hillsides could be formed, even shallow caves and overhangs just by sculpting with such a small flame source (and no mess like filing creates).
Steve Caple said:

Ummmmm.... I don't think so. :/
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 03:05:13 +0200, Robert Heller

Yep...really good for that. Also used in many commercial jobs between the masonry and exterior walls......and used for insulation under siding over the exterior sheathing , usually 1", under siding , exterior of commercial building under the pre-cast panels, under floors both concrete and wood. I have seen it , although I wouldn't do it , as the only sheathing on exterior walls of residential jobs. Usually 1" and then the vinly siding goes right over that. Not very much strength there , most of the strength is now in the drywall. The vinyl siding just hangs there and does nothing.
It is available in the south but it's not near as prevelant on the west coast. I don't know why since they need to insulate for AC. They use a lot of insulation out there called R Tek
Why am I going on like this.....this is a train group , not a construction forum ?
My wife had me locked in the cellar all day :-(...and I needed someone to talk to. I stayed up too late last night playing with my Big Boy and she was upset.
Thank you
Ken Day

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Try looking in the yellow pages for insulation contractors...."cold storage" or "low temp".
For the most part they will have tons of scraps on jobsites that you can have for free.
Dow's blue board that is thick enough to build a layout on is usually called SE ( square edged) or SM ( smooth material) and comes in 2'x8' sheets( some plants are putting out 4 x 8 sheets, but not all) from 1/2 inch think up to 3" thickness.
I can't remember the PSI of the SE but is was higher than the material used in homesites.
The best of the best is the grey board by Dow that is used in cold storage warehouses and depending on the floor load and how high they going to build pallet racks will determine whick PSI greyboard the contractor uses.
< scratching head and trying to remember>
I think: SE blueboard is 30 psi HL 60 is 60 PSI HL 120 is 120 psi
They might have different types out now but when I was involved in cold storage design those were the most common psi's.
Again, look for low temp or cold storage contractors or "industrial" insulation suppliers in the yelloow pages.
While you're there check to see if they have hydrocal.....our "cost" on it was usually about 6 bucks for 80 lbs sack of B-11. It's used for making insulated fittings for industrial insulation on pipes usually in petro chemical plants. The B-11 is mixed and used as a glue to bind the pieces together to make the fittings.
Hope this helps
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On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 20:55:18 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

I'm in the process of landscaping my layout now. I used 1x3's for the table frame, 3/8" plywood on top and then 1" white styrofoam on top of that. Though it is messy to cut(I have no hotwire), it's excellent for applying scenery, building up mountains, cliffs...etc. Any glue will stick to it( that i've tried). I mostly use Elmers and Hobetac. Acrylic paint will be fine but i'd avoid latex base, it will peel. For building mountains or hills, break pieces to shape, pad with some newspaper or cardboard strips and then hit it with plaster clothe. HTH, dAN
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Gabriel (?) posted:

Sounds cool! I've tried some more sources and that extruded foam stuff just isn't used around here. The one home building site I found was using the white foam and the guy at Lowes said he'd been in the area for 20 years and never got a request to order any of it. So, good or bad, it looks like I'll be trying the white board. I think I'm actually looking forward to the challenge of using something a bit more unusual to work with (for some reason). And thank you especially for the acrylic good, latex bad note. There's a pitfall I can avoid. :)
I bought a small piece today to pin flex track on and check different radiuses and curves. I know I can get away with 6-8" with the On30 0-4-0 and stubby car kits (like Boulder Valley & International Hobby makes) but will check with some old HO standard boxcars hooked up to see what happens. Forward and reverse. Full speed. See what it can take.
If you come across anything interesting while working with the white board, please let me know. Have you tried a mini torch for forming shapes into the foam? I've only tested it on some really cheap foam used as packing blocks in a shipping box but it seemed to work nice without burning the surface. And no mess. If you try it, have an extinguisher or something close by just in case as I've only tested on a small area so far.
~Brad H.
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This maybe a dumb question...Did you check your local mom & pop hardware store? Even if they don't stock it, they can probably add it to an order from one of their suppliers. You may have to wait a short while until they get an order to justify shipping. Also check your area lumberyards and concrete suppliers...more and more foam is used for foundations and as a light weight filler. I check with my sources frequently to purchase at a reduced price sheets that were damaged. Usually anything less than a half sheet doesn't sell, I get it for cents on the dollar...I break or cut them up anyway, so why not save a few bucks in the process. Also check with manufacturers in your area, sometimes they receive shipments that are packed with insulation foamboard to prevent damage in shipping. Doors and window contractors are a good source for foam used as packing material. I've also scored some great deals at a distributor where I get my 4x8 sheets of styrene. It comes sandwiched between sheets of foam to them, cheaper than plywood and lighter. Just a thought.
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