Kit building adhesive question

It's been quite some time since I've assembled a plastic kit and now find that the Testor's model cement I used to use is no longer formulated the
same as it was in the past (due to glue sniffing concerns I gather, which unfortunately means I can no longer celebrate the completion of a kit by huffing the balance of the cement). What are some good adhesives to use for Walthers kits and similar ones other than going striaght to the Super Glue gel types (I'm too much of a fumble butt to use those without gluing myself to something or something)?
TIA,
Regards.
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Testor's 3507 is still a good glue for plastics.
Rashputin wrote:

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I have had good sucess with MEK available at most hardware stores. It is said to have been the main ingredient of the old Testors. As always use with adequate ventilation. Roger Aultman
Charles Kimbrough wrote:

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On Fri, 27 May 2005 12:10:55 -0400, "Rashputin"

One of the master modelers at he local model rail shop I patronized turned me on to "Tenax 7R" about a year or so ago, and I am VERY happy with the way it works.
I find that the Testor's Liquid Plastic Cement makes very good paintbrush cleaner.....
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Get a quart can of MEK from you local hardware store. Put some into a small (2oz) glass bottle, and apply to joints with a small paint brush. Capillary action brings the MEK into the joint. The MEK is a solvent, and it dissolves the plastic at the joint before the solvent evaporates. After the solvent evaporates, the plastic hardens and you have a good joint. It cures overnight to a very hard joint. However, you can glue up two pieces, let the solvent evaporate in about 15 seconds, and then move on to the next joint.
Tenax 7R is MEK with perfume to make it smell better. I think it is diluted some also since the joint does not set up as fast as with straight MEK.
Of course, on a per once basis, buying the quart can is only about $4.50 and the 2 oz bottle of Tenax is about $2.00, so you do the math.
Peter
wrote :

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Tenax 7R is methylene chloride, AKA dimethyl chloride. Not the same stuff as methyl ethyl ketone - MEK Methylene chloride is a much more agressive solvent than MEK and it has a lower vapor pressure, which means that it evaporates more slowly. The joints take longer to cure because they are penetrated more deeply by the solvent, which takes longer to evaporate. You can make your own general purpose "one glue fitz all" concoction by mixing acetone, methylene chloride, methyl ethyl ketone, toulene and xylene.
Straight methylene chloride is available at home improvement stores like Lowe's, Home Despot, Menards, etc. packaged as stripper, e.g., 'KUTZIT'. Get the thin stuff, not the heavy-bodied stuff that is made to stick. Read the list of ingredients on the side of the package to see what you are getting. Froggy,
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Froggy@thepond..com wrote:
<snip>

Dimethyl chloride is a non-name. It fits no system of commercial or chemical nomenclature of which I am aware. The preferred (scientific) name for this material is dichloromethane.

I'm sorry, but, this is false. The boiling point for methylene chloride is 40-41 degrees Centigrade, while that of MEK is 80 degrees Centigrade. <snip>

It probably should also be mentioned that methylene chloride has been reported to be more deleterious to health than had been previously thought. I hope this letter has been of some aid. Thank you. Jerry
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I put the MEK in the empty Testors bottles, leaving the Tenax ones alone. I like Tenax for what it does, so I don't want to have it mixed up with straight MEK....
Kennedy
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On Fri, 27 May 2005 18:14:16 GMT, "Peter J. Gross"

Thanks for the suggestion....but the Tenax 7R is even more expensive that the $2.00 you suggest! Last bottle was $3.49!!!!!
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wrote :

Wow, thanks for all the good information. I'll be mixing up my own and trying the others at once.
Thanks again,
Regards
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find
for
Glue
myself
Contrary to some (or all) of the other responders to OP, I find uses for both Tenax and MEK. Tenax is really good for delicate stuff but when I have a large joint to glue up, I reach for the can of MEK. I find that MEK is more aggressive than Tenax and for small parts tends to distort them.
Norm
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I have been using the Faller Super Expert [orange bottle]plastic glue with the needle-nose applicator. Around $5 per bottle, but it goes a long way. The Faller Expert [white bottle] seems to be the same stuff with a more disagreeable odor. I try to avoid the chemicals others have been describing, since I was exposed to them in my cabinet shop and know the damage they can do to your lungs.
Rashputin wrote:

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I appreciate the responses. I used MEK on a kit and after I got used to it, it seems fine. The joints are strong and clean. I'll try the others as well as I get back into the hobby more.
Again, thanks a lot.
Regards all
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