Longest journey?

Salvé
A question regarding railway journey's here, Assuming one travelled from
the very north of north america (USA or Canada) how far South can one go
travelling only by Rail? where would the journey start ( Alaska or
Newfoundland and what town....) and where would it end and on what railways
(railroads) would one travel? travelling by taxi for the purposes of
changing Railroad lines is ok if it's in th same town.
Beowulf
Reply to
Beowulf
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The Alaska RR runs from Anchorage to Fairbanks (?). No connection to the south by rail.
The White Pass & Yukon, when I was there in 1992, said it was no longer a common carrier and was only a tourist line. It used to connect Skagway to Dawson, Yukon. But again, there's no rail connection to the south.
Churchill is the farthest north I'm aware of without digging.
Jay CNS&M North Shore Line - "First and fastest"
Reply to
JCunington
Good Morning!
Forget the exact details but it was possible to travel a rather good distance in the 1920s by Interurban-- TrolleyCar from New York well into Wisconsin -- But M-a-n-y changes.
Believe a book on this subject was published.
Waiting for a bus is as thrilling as fishing, with the similar tantalisation that something, sometime, somehow, will turn up. George Courtauld
James B. Holland
? Holland Electric Railway Operation....... "O"--Scale St.-Petersburg Trams Company (SPTC) Trolleycars and "O"--Scale Parts including Q-Car mailto: snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
? Pennsylvania Trolley Museum
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Pittsburgh Railways Company (PRCo), 1930 -- 1950 ? N.M.R.A. Life member #2190;
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Reply to
Jim Holland
My mother took me to visit a friend of hers in Chicago and see the Railroad Fair in 1951 - we left Decatur on the Illinois Terminal RR and transferred to the Roarin' Elgin. Not a super long trip, but decidedly better than taking the 'Hound.
Reply to
Steve Caple
A friend of mine was trying to get hired by a company that was working towards the early stages of setting up a rail connection across the Bering Straits to Russia via British Columbia, theYukon and Alaska.
Personally, I have big doubts this is possible with current technologies, so I am happy they didn't hire her. I have the idea it was all a big scam.
But on the off chance they ever are successful, there is a new longest journey. :)
Babboo
Reply to
Babboo
New York to London in how many years...?
:-)
John
Reply to
John Wood
And also back in the day, you could travel from the Great Lakes deep into Texas via narrow gauge!
Reply to
Brian Paul Ehni
Wow...if they did it you could go from Halifax all the way to Moscow by train....that would be some trip
Reply to
Gene
I'm envious! That would have been a great trip...
Reply to
Mark Newton
I remember some Santa Fe stuff the most: a Navajo sand painting crew, and what I think was a Blue Goose Hudson, although I don't think they were on regular runs at that time. Maybe they ran it in for show, or it might have been some other road's streamlined steam engine. I was not particularly conversant in steam loco lore at the age of 8: I remember taking the Wabash from Decatur to Peru around that time and being surprised by one of their semi-streamlined class P-1 Hudsons with elephant ear smoke deflectors. Quite a sight in that Wabash blue.
Reply to
Steve Caple
On 3/6/04 6:33 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@netnews.comcast.net, "Steve Caple" wrote:
Not just "a" Blue Goose Hudson; it would have been "the", as ATSF had only one.
Reply to
Brian Paul Ehni
He did question whether connections by barge might be allowed. The Alaska RR does have a car float operation from Seattle to Whittier.
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Imagine seeing Conrail boxcars in Anchorage. :-{)
Reply to
Rick Jones
Salvé
Barge away dear boy, : ) beowulf
Reply to
Beowulf

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