Mrklin Maintenance Manuals

Is there any URL to maintenance documents for older Mrklin locos? I opened up one of my old locos just to have a look and it's mostly sound
but needs a bit of lube and maybe new brushes (more on that in a separate posting). Back in 1967 or so when I got it, it came with a detailed instruction booklet in German which I no longer have. In my vague memory, there were several places where you were supposed to put oil, but now when I look at it I can only identify two for sure.
/Torsten
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- You need a tiny drop of oil on each end of the motor armature shaft. Quite probably there is a small reservoir above each of these bearings consisting of a (tiny) rectangular slot with foam rubber like material in it. - From there, you need to follow down the gear train - each gear revolves on a peg or axle. The peg or axle deserves a drop of oil. - The outer teeth of each gear also need a drop of oil. That drop will spread around the gear teeth and on to the mating gear by itself. - Each rail wheel axle needs a drop. (between the wheel and the frame) - Each intervening gear axle needs a drop. (opposite side of the frame - you will see a hole and a shiney axle end) - The side rods need a drop where they revolve around the crank pins. - A small drop on every valve gear rivet. - a drop on each piston rod.
I use a piece of fine steel wire to apply the oil. Dip it into a bottle of sewing machine oil and then use it to apply ONE drop to all the spots mentioned above. The absolutely critical points are the two armature shaft bearings - too little and they will scream and wear very quickly - too much, especially on the one between the brushes will spread oil onto the commutator and brushes, which will destroy the carbon brush.
Regards, Greg.P.
Torsten Lif wrote:

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Greg Procter wrote:

Found these. Either my "foam rubber like" material has deteriorated in the 40 years since the loco was built, or they used a different material then.
What I have looks like some pad of fibres or felt.

Thanks!
/Torsten
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Torsten Lif wrote:

So long as they are there and hold some oil to slowly drop down and oil the bearings!
Torsten Lif wrote:

I just hoped I didn't give too much information and cause you a headache.

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Torsten Lif wrote:

Check
http://www.maerklin.de/service /
There are listings of replacement parts, some with drawings, which may meet your need. At any rate, the exploded drawings may help you figure out where to oil the mech.
HTH
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Does anyone know why the subject header of these postings is so peculiar-looking?
=?iso-8859-1 ?q?Mrklin_Maintenance_Manuals ? What's all that extra stuff?
Froggy,
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

The "a" is umlauted, ie it has two dots above it because it is actually "ae". Your Windows can't handle it because you have your character set set to US english or British English or something else... press 'Alt' while typing 132 and it will probably print the character on screen.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Yes, I allowed for the "", but what is all that other stuff? To wit: =?iso-8859-1 ?q? Froggy,
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Ooops. Mea maxima culpa.
ISO 8859-1, also known as "Latin-1" is the standard for encoding characters outside the ASCII set but in common use in Western (European) countries. Like the a with two dots over it in "Mrklin". The "=E4" part is the hex code of that character in the Latin-1 table. If you were to look in some other table you might find that =E4 was some Cyrillic, Korean or other "exotic" non-English letter.
Co-incidentally: In Germany the convention for writing "ae" instead of "" is common. In Norway (and Denmark, I think) they have a composite "ae" as a single char but in Swedish it is always just the a with the two dots over it. We also have an a with a ring over it and an o with two dots. In German, the "" and "" are sorted with "a" and "o" and are considered mere variants of these, but we consider ours as completely separate vowels and place them last in the alphabet, "xyz".
But I don't think it matters on this group unless somebody finds some example of them being used in some train designation. :-)
I'll stop putting "" in the titles of my postings.
/Torsten
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It doesn't matter Torsten, I was just curious about the way the things were working. Some people see everything just the way they are supposed to, while others get strange things on the screen. It appears to be slight incompatability issues between operating systems. No big deal. Froggy,
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