Re: New ho scale curvature

=>Does 7ft sound to wide, how do you work out what the radius should be, given
=>the fact that I'm not running any long equipment eg, running with box cars,
=>tanks, coal cars, & mainly older style diesel engines bought 2nd hand off
=>other railroads & just because I can, any train that has to stop or back up
=>on the main line due to switching is to have a caboose (Yah)!.
=>
=>You wouldnt believe how much fun I am having doing this..:)
The NMRA suggests 24" radius for cars and locos up to about 60ft in length.
In a 7ft wide peninsula, you can have a curve of 36-38" radius, so your
trains will look very nice. Such a radius also leaves plenty of room for
sidings inside the curve. You should leave a space of 4" or more between the
track and the edge of the layout for safety - reduces the odds that a
derailed train will fall to the floor. Also reduces the odds that someone's
careless elbow will bump the train. If you must have a narrower space, fasten
strips of clear plastic aliong the layout edge to protect the trains.
You will also need some sort of access to the insde of the peninsula, as you
cannot reach into it very well. Tables/shelves should be 2ft wide or less
between edge and backdrop for comfortable and safe reach. They can be up to
about 3ft -- but that extra 12 inches or so may put something just out reach
without leaning on the layout, which may cause some, er, geological
disruptions.:-) In your case, I would build the peninsula hollow, that is,
put up the backdrop 2 to 2-1/2 ft from the edge. This will leave an internal
space of 2-3ft wide. The alternative would be to build a number of removable
scenery sections so you can pop up inside the layout for maintenance, etc.
Enjoy!
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
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Too wide? No. You really can't make curves too broad. With seven feet to work with, you can have 36" curves, plus a few inches extra, which is always good, as track right up against the aisle both looks bad and is a recipe for disaster when equipment derails. Most people would kill to have room for 36" radius curves, so consider yourself very fortunate. The problem, of course, is that reaching the middle of a seven-foot-wide peninsula isn't practical from the aisle. It is best to have most of your major trackwork within two feet of an aisle. Some minor trackwork and uncomplicated scenery you won't need to reach often can be another six inches to a foot further. In a seven-foot-wide peninsula, you will either need an access hatch in the middle, or possibly a dead space, with no track and scenery, hidden by either scenery or a backdrop.
Mark Alan Miller
Reply to
Mark Alan Miller
My baseboard width for that section would be 1ft. Because that means I can spend more time doing the scenery & making it look good ;) so access is no worries, infact on my whole layout the maximum baseboard width is 3-4ft for industrial or scenic viewing, with the tracks absolutely no further than 2ft, so I dont have to crush stuff reaching all the time. And I can fit more track in if I have a narrower width, just ask Joe Fugate, which is actually where I got the idea from, all credit to the man I say.
Reply to
Snowy
My baseboard width for that section would be 1ft. Because that means I can spend more time doing the scenery & making it look good ;) so access is no worries, infact on my whole layout the maximum baseboard width is 3-4ft for industrial or scenic viewing, with the tracks absolutely no further than 2ft, so I dont have to crush stuff reaching all the time. And I can fit more track in if I have a narrower width, just ask Joe Fugate, which is actually where I got the idea from, all credit to the man I say. ----------------------------------------------
Sounds as though you have a winner!
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:
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Bill

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