Re: Sort of OT: The Truth Will Out!

THEY DID IT TO SCARE PEOPLE AWAY FROM AIR TRAVEL SO THAT THEY WOULD RIDE MORE TRAINS.????
Oh palease... The WTC lost money from day 1 and it's a world icon on
many levels so it was a natural choice. I don't know what kind of moronic crap you're selling here...
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Big Rich Soprano wrote:

A "World Icon"????
Where do you get these silly stories?
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Where did tourists go - from all countries - when they went to NYC? WTC...
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Broadway?
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Roger T. wrote:

Times Square. Statue of Liberty. The U.N.
--

Rick Jones
Remove the Extra Dot to e-mail me
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No such luck. (And sorry: I missed this line of yours on my first scan.)
Based on current research, dark energy will continue to force the universe to expand at an increasing rate until each atomic particle is eventually an infinite distance from every other particle. This means that there will be plenty of space for building the largest model railroad you can imagine, but nowhere to plug in the transformer for all of eternity.
Shortly afterwards, Amtrack will arrive somewhere on schedule.
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P. Roehling wrote:

Point to you.
;-)
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On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:48:41 -0800, P. Roehling wrote:

Not if John Snow has anything to say about it.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res 06E6DB1F3EF935A3575BC0A9659C8B63
--
Steve

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On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 11:48:41 -0800, P. Roehling wrote:

Further - and more on point as to just WHO is screwing the public, train riders or not ... (think John Snow and his ilk):
The following URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/15/national/15rail.html?_r=1 & amp;eiP94&en694b3d228bad11&hp=&ex9789920 0&partner=homepage&pagewanted=print&position=&am p;oref=slogin
has a length of 161 characters and resulted in the following TinyURL which has a length of 25 characters:
http://tinyurl.com/2tmtbq
"Her other lawyer, Christian D. Searcy, said he had even asked Amtrak officials to state in writing whether they had reimbursed CSX. "They said no letter will be forthcoming," Mr. Searcy said.
Mrs. Palank said the jury was never told that CSX would escape the sting of its verdict. "It's so secretive, so manipulative," she said. "Someone in the federal government needs to answer for this, because there was no legal justification for them to be paying for somebody else's wrongdoing."
Mark Geistfeld, a law professor at New York University, said indemnification, a form of insurance, has its limits. "Certainly, you cannot get insurance for criminal fines, for example," Professor Geistfeld said. "It's against public policy. No court would enforce it." But, whether Amtrak should have paid in this case depends on what kind of behavior you are talking about, he added.
Mr. Downs, the former Amtrak chief, said that after the railroad's lawyers told him Amtrak could not escape paying the punitive verdict, he called John Snow, then CSX's chief executive, to complain. Mr. Snow, now President Bush's treasury secretary, said in essence that a deal was a deal, Mr. Downs recalls. Mr. Snow declined to discuss the conversation or the case. CSX also declined to comment specifically on Amtrak's payment of punitive damages.
Amtrak's obligation did not end with the $63.8 million payment to Mrs. Palank, though. It was also responsible for $24 million in compensatory damages to her and other crash victims, for a total of $88 million. For causing the accident, CSX paid the Federal Railroad Administration the maximum fine - $20,000."
Of course, the Republicans will tell you it's all the fault of the trial lawyers . . .
--
Steve

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I needed an eastern name as the model is location is southern Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes. There was a railway in Canada called "Pacific Great Eastern" so I simple use the "Great Eastern" part of the decals combined with Canadian Pacific 1950s striping (lining) and bingo, a freelanced colour scheme.
The 2-10-0s have been kitbashed even more since these photos were taken. They now have smaller steam domes and sandboxes and their Russian ancestry is greatly diminished.

Yes, designed by I K. Brunell later converted to a cable layer, went aground somewhere in South America (?) and in recent times towed back the UK and restored.
-- Cheers
Roger T. Home of the Great Eastern Railway at:- http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra / Latitude: 48 25' North Longitude: 123 21' West
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She was always considered an unlucky "Hoodoo" ship because two men were crushed to death at her launching, and, like some locomotives, she was involved in many accidents of one sort and another over the years; although the stories about a couple of her construction crew being accidentally entombed between sections of her double hull were apparently just rumors....
-Pete
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You're mixing up two of Brunel's three ships. He built the Great Western, Great Britain, and Great Eastern. The Great Western and Great Eastern are gone. The Great Britain was used to store wool for many years in the Falklands, sunk as a navigation hazard, and refloated and returned for restoration to the Bristol dry dock in which she was built in 1970.

The space between the Great Eastern's double hull was used to store coal. The space was not sealed, and no doubt was inspected before or after launching. Rumor it is that construction workers were entombed there.
The Great Eastern was simply too big for its time, and was not a commercial success. It did have one advantage over all other ships of its time: it could hold the entire Trans Atlantic cable. It had a reasonable career laying cables at various places around the world.
--
Bill Kaiser
snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
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