Slightly OT question

Does anybody know when doublestacks were 1st put into service, because I
just watched "Riding The Bullet", a new Stephen King movie and a stack train
was passing as he walked by the tracks and I thought that seemed strange.
The movie was set in 1969, if anybody has a rough idea I like to hear it.
Thanks
Reply to
Ewok
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"> Does anybody know when doublestacks were 1st put into service, because I "> just watched "Riding The Bullet", a new Stephen King movie and a stack train "> was passing as he walked by the tracks and I thought that seemed strange. "> The movie was set in 1969, if anybody has a rough idea I like to hear it.
This is most likely a movie goof. The people is Hollywood often have no clue WRT era correct trains.
"> "> "> "> Thanks "> "> ">
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Reply to
Robert Heller
The double-stack concept was developed by Southern Pacific and Sea-Land, and the first small group of cars was built by ACF. The cars, about 100 of them, went into service in the 1970s
SteVe Ewok wrote:
Reply to
highrails2001
Late 70's...the movie "Ray" based on Ray Charles also has a Double Stack train in it..and that is like 1946 or something
Reply to
David Epling
After that, I'm sure. But movies have a tendency to not worry about trains unless the plot demands it. I saw "I Was a Fugitive From a Georgia Chaingang" and in the beginning the protagonist is walking through a yard. Did you know that there were tons of steel sided, 50' no roof walk, short ladder box cars in 1919?
Ewok wrote:
Reply to
G.M.
I just watched "Auswich" (sp?) on video. The Russian Su class loco and train ran all the way to Munich. I know they exchange bogies on coaches at the Russian border, but steam loco wheels?
Reply to
Greg Procter
The original prototype went into service in 1977. See the following URLs for more info:
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Reply to
Brian Paul Ehni
Did that really hurt the plot of the movie?
Reply to
Mark Mathu
"M> "Robert Heller" wrote in message "M> news:bed00$42fb4f8e$cb248f0$ snipped-for-privacy@nf1.news-service.com... "M> "M> > The people is Hollywood often have no clue WRT era correct trains. "M> "M> Did that really hurt the plot of the movie?
Probably not. But given how much era-specific detail Hollywood *generally* puts into other (background) aspects of movies, it generally behooves Hollywood to be a little more careful when then make period pieces to make sure that *all* things are historically correct, and that includes any trains that pass across the 'background'. They are real careful to get all of the current vintage SUVs off the streets and roads when they shoot scenes featuring those streets and roads for some period piece. At the very least they can call up the RR and get some idea when there will be a *modern* stack train passing through and adjust their shooting schedule accordingly. Or at least take a 5-10 minute break when the train passes through (like they do when a modern jet plane passes over).
"M> "M> "M>
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Reply to
Robert Heller
Google the prhrases "Riding The Bullet" & "low budget" together -- and you'll get a sense of how this movie was put together.
Reply to
Mark Mathu
...recall an older western and while no specific date could be given from the rest of the film its time frame was probably 1880 1890...yet, a bunch of cowboys were herded off a cattle car which had a built date of 1910.
Reply to
Whodunnit
"> I just watched "Riding The Bullet", a new Stephen King movie and a stack train "> was passing as he walked by the tracks and I thought that seemed strange. "> The movie was set in 1969, if anybody has a rough idea I like to hear it.
This is most likely a movie goof. The people is Hollywood often have no clue WRT era correct trains. ============== A classic movie/train goof I recall was in the film Back To The Future 3. The movie takes place in 1885 but, according to Armstrong's book, The Railroad - What It Is, What It Does, the knuckle coupler seen on the train in the movie didn't come into use until 1889. Prior to that date they were using the link and pin coupling method.
Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" (Modeling 1969 In HO.)
Reply to
The CB&Q Guy
I saw that not so great movie on DVD a while agot. I also noticed the double stack goof - and also the end of the train had and EOT (End of Train) device on the last car's coupler! These surely weren't around in 1969!
It's funny that some movie makers go to extremes to make their work as authentic as possible, yet miss such obvious gaffs.
They should have hired a railfan as a consultant!
Bob Boudreau Canada
Reply to
Railfan
It ain't what a man knows that gits him in trouble. It's what he thinks he knows, but don't. Froggy,
Reply to
Froggy
Can't be any worse than a movie I saw a blooper about depicting ancient Rome and there a truck driving down the road in the distance reflected of some glass
Reply to
Tim Coyle

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