Southern California '20s and '30s Modular Group.

I was invited to run with these guys last weekend at an NMRA modular
layout shindig out in Palos Verdes. (Think rich southern Los Angeles.
Horses, expensive blondes, Etc.) Of the seven different modular
groups that were there, the '20s & '30s guys easily had the best
looking layout, and things ran pretty consistantly, too.
Couldn't get any sharp pictures of the rolling stock due to the
somewhat dim lighting and the fact that the rolling stock was, well,
constantly rolling! But here are a few shots of the scenery, which
fortunately held still for the camera.
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Enjoy!
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
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Nice pictures and good to see a layout from that era that is not a caricature.
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
Fantastic pictures of a fantastic model. The street trackage is particularly good. Do you know how they got the pavement between the rails to look so prototypical?
Reply to
Special Agent Melvin Purvis
No. I don't. But the guy who did those modules is a friend of mine and I can ask him if you'd like -and post his answer (if any) here.
That individual is an outstanding modeler, BTW, and his Packard Dealership model has an interesting backstory: Several years ago he found an old building in Claremont CA (his home town) which was being rebuilt into a frou-frou botique and thought to himself "That's an original 1930s California Art Deco building if ever I've seen one" and decided to model it on the spot. He had no idea what the building had been used for back then, but thought it looked as if it might have been a car dealership of some kind, and chose to make it a Packard dealership at random.
In chapter two, a couple of years later on, his town was holding an anniversary (?) celebration and asked him to display his module there. He did so, and one guy observing the module said "Oh, wow! I remember that building from back when I was a kid!"
"Was it by any chance a car dealership?" asked our protagonist.
"Why yes!" says the guy.
"And do you remember what kind of cars they sold?" says our boy.
"No", comes the answer; but I'll bet my dad does. He grew up in this town."
So a couple of days later there comes a phone call from a very elderly gent who says "My son told me that you wanted to know what sort of car dealership used to be in that building. That was the local Packard dealership."
Serendipity.
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil
[...]
Agreed, the roads are very well done. Just looking at them, I'd say the main trick is the colour. Asphalt roads aren't black. The gravel roads by the farm and the grain elevator are superb: looks like there was recent rain!
[time passes]
Studying at the pictures again, two things stand out. First, the arrangement and relative sizes of the buildings, the roads, the open spaces. Everything is in proportion, you have to make a conscious effort to realise that pretty well everything selectively compressed.
Second, the overall colour scheme. There are few pure bright colours (on a few vehicles, etc), the buildings and the landscape share the same subdued palette, there are no shiny surfaces in strange places, saturation (colour intensity) is low, textures are subtle.
Very well done, worth careful study. Pete, kindly convey my compliments to the builder(s).
HTH Wolf K.
Reply to
Wolf K
I was particularly taken by the fallen branch across the dirt road near the grain elevator.
Note that you can tell it's been down for several days because the leaves are starting to turn brown...
Somebody put some thought into that, and it's something I've never seen modeled before.
~Pete
Reply to
Twibil

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