Spraybooth fan Help?

I was wondering if someone knows where I can buy a fan for my modelrailroad spraybooth. The one I had before was a pancake type that ran on on AC, where can I
find such a unit. If somebody has any other ideas could you help? TIA.
Mike Butler Chicago,IL Long live the SOO!
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On Fri, 4 Jan 2008 04:59:59 -0600, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net instead replied:

Mike,
Go here: http://www.alltronics.com
Put "ac fan" in the Quick Search box, without the quotes, and you'll get several that would work just fine. -- Ray
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instead replied:

From what I read about building an air brush, the fan needs to be a little better than your average AC fan. Paints tend to use flamable solvents, and many fans tend to produce tiny sparks. The logic is sound to me, but I do realize you could probably use a fan for years with nothing happening.
I've had a candle lit in a cardboard box (with a hole cut above it) to try to eliminate some of the spray paint overspray. One day, I got the amount of paint in the box over the flash point and got a bit of a fireball. Thankfully, that was it.
Puckdropper
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Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
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Puckdropper wrote:

If sparks are the worry, then a low voltage (12V) brushless motor fan (like in a PC) should be plenty safe. No sparks possible and very cheap. I would recommend using 120mm fan(s) or larger for lots of air flow and quiet running. :-)
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On 04 Jan 2008 18:43:51 GMT, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and

An open flame is hardly the same as a brushless AC fan. There's no sparking there at all. -- Ray
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On 1/4/2008 10:43 AM Puckdropper spake thus:

Common sense is your friend here. On the one extreme, sure, if you used a fan driven by a "universal" AC/DC motor--the type used in small power tools, blenders, etc.--you'd have the hazard of sparking brushes which could definitely cause a flashover.
The other end of the spectrum is the super-paranoid one, where one goes out and invests in the "recommended" TEFC (totally-enclosed, fan-cooled) explosion-proof motor specifically made for venting spray booths and such. You can get such a beast for only a couple hundred bucks.
But if you're building a spray booth for occasional use, it's fine to use any of the little "boxer" fans (remember when that's what they were called?) found in computer power supplies, etc., whether 12 volt, 24 volt, 120 volt or whatever. They produce no sparks whatsoever and are safe. I've used them for years with no problems. Plus they're cheap and readily available everywhere.
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On Fri, 04 Jan 2008 13:45:09 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

I've got a couple of 6" 120v fans in the lower side air inlets to my 1939 Heatilator fireplace - they move the air a lot beter than the convection it was dewsigned to use, but aren't the quietest in the world. There are some super quiet 120mm fans out there now, or you can operate older 12v 120mm fans at 7v (feed them from the +5 and +12 volt pins of the Molex plug); I plan to use a couple of those in each inlet and feed them from an old PC power supply.
--
Steve

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Pucky my boy, you are one seriously insane lunatic!!! Did your eyebrows ever grow back??
Paul
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.wan.vpn (Paul Newhouse) wrote in writes:

No loss of eyebrows to report. It was working, and I had done it several times safely (er... without incident) before that last time. It's better to light a candle ELSEWHERE in the room if you've got to share modeling space and primary living space.
If you're in such a situation, get a spray booth. At about $300 for one from Micromark (and $10 for dryer exhaust hose), it's cheaper than a doctor visit. (I got mine last Christmas.) You can get/make your own devices to exhaust something out a window without having the window open completely. (It's a hole in a piece of plastic.)
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
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Glad to hear there was no serious damage but, candles in spray booths is just plain nuts!!
A member of the club built a box approximately 2' wide, 3.5ft high and 18-20" deep. He attached an oven ventilator fan to the back over an ~8" hole. It's a great sparay booth. We just run over to his house when the weather is nice, put the booth on a portable workbench in the driveway. Works great. He stores it on top of the fridge in his garage.
Don't think we'll be trying the candle idea.
later dude, Paul N.
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If you're working outside in the driveway, why do you need a spray booth?
--
Bill Kaiser
snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
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On 8 Jan 2008 13:47:45 -0500, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and

I'm treating this as a serious question but I have my doubts that it really is.
Airborne dust, pollen and insects can and do drop onto paint while it dries so a paint booth, inside or out, is handy. Also, the sun can dry paint too quickly making it peel later or blister as it's drying. It controls the environment very near to the object. -- Ray
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I think his point was that you could just use a cardboard box to cover it after you spray. The construction of a wooden box with forced ventilation was extreme overkill; however, we are talking about a hobby, and anything that keeps one occupied, even the building of a portable paint booth, is part of the pleasure.
I have a friend who is a model car collector and when he paints a model he puts it under a bell jar to dry. That does a fine job of keeping the dust off of the tacky surface.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2008 12:55:06 -0800 (PST), I said, "Pick a card, any
instead replied:

I think it's a terrific idea to keep dust and other particles from tacky paint. That was my reason for replying. A paint booth moved to the driveway to work is also much easier than hunting down a box just for that purpose. Your mileage may vary, of course. -- Ray
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On 1/8/2008 1:15 PM Ray Haddad spake thus:

... unless your "spray booth" happens to *be* a cardboard box, as mine is. (But with forced ventilation, via dryer vent hose and a small box w/2 computer fans.)
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2008 17:40:08 -0800, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Which makes it a spray booth vs a box you have to hunt down to use. -- Ray
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Plus all the things Ray pointed out.

Yeah, and after we paint we put them under a cardboard box, lined with polyethelene (sp?? same stuff as dry cleaner plastic bags). Really cuts down on the blemishes.

It put some left overs to good use.

*8^)) YUP!!

After they dry a bit we put them in filtered, dehydrator for a few hours.
Paul N.
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So we can suck the overspray through a filter and not have it drift every where and land on things we don't want it on. AND it makes for a nice wind break, there is still a little breeze even on still days.
Paul N.
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I bought a squirrel cage Dayton blower (no fire hazard) from Grainger approx like this www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/2C647. I'd have to check the exact CFM rating. Works well with no fumes or overspray.
Todd
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

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