Train Room

On 6/18/2009 12:11 PM NICHE541 spake thus:

I think you misunderstand.

You don't get it; gloating is a *good* thing. I'd do it if I was building a train room that size. (It's all meant in fun.)

Me too.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Sorry if I came off negative, it's just strange ( to me ) to have windows in a train room. I believe in lineal layouts with backdrops. Don't worry about anyone thinking you are gloating, maybe they are just jealous.
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*snip*
Mind a random physics related question? In a 0-G environment (such as space is often portrayed), wouldn't things tend to stay exactly where they were rather than all of a sudden float up?
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On Jun 19, 12:15 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Um, do you mean "suddenly float up" as in what they might do if/when acceleration suddenly ceased?
Depends. Could happen several way.
(A) Big rockets such as space vehicles shake like *crazy* while they're thrusting, and inertia keeps the ship vibrating like a tuning fork for a second or two after the engines shut down, so this motion would tend to push anything that wasn't anchored down away from whatever it was touching.
(B) If the object in question had any "spring" to it (and many things do) the sudden cessation of acceleration would cause that compressed potential energy to unload and "spring" the object away from it's contact point.
(C) When acceleration ceases, some things in the cabin of a space vehicle keep moving. Things such as the air, which is circulated with fans so that stagnant spots of Co2 don't develop. Since weight goes away with acceleration, but mass doesn't, anything loose in the spacecraft's cabin will be blown about: relatively massive objects such as astronauts will take a while to begin moving, but objects of very low mass -such as dust or pieces of paper- will promptly begin drifting around in the air currents. (And this is why spacecraft are assembled in "clean rooms".)
All of the above probably explain why space vehicles and the things that go into them are so throughly equipped with velcro surfaces, zippers, latching drawers, and the like.
You pick up the strangest things when you teach at a college and hang out in the Physics department...
~Pete
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What brought the question up was a small segment I caught of 2001: A Space Odyssey. A man had a food tray on his lap, and let go of it to talk to another one. The tray then started floating up on its own like a helium balloon. If really in 0-G, I would have though it'd stay in place, or if it did start moving it'd just creep.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On 19 Jun 2009 11:47:28 GMT, Puckdropper wrote:

You assume he let go of it with perfect symmetry and did not impart any acceleration to it in any direction - pretty hard to do/
--
Steve

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Niche541,
When I finished our "bonus room" over our new garage, I used trac lighting. I had the contractor assist with two separate circuits in the room. The advantages are that as the layout changes or I work on different areas, I can move & swivel lights to provide plenty of light for working areas. I can also use spots to highlight special areas like my 85' high (scale of course) curved wooden trestle. I also like the "warm" look of incandescents in available light photos.
Obviously if you have a double deck for the HO layout, you will need something under the upper deck to light the lower one and trac probably wouldn't work there. The same might be true for your O scale stuff at floor level.
Keep in mind that asking a question of ten modelers will get you at least 11 answers cause at least one of them has two opinions!
Don't take most of the responses here as being negative. While there are a couple of people who don't like to "play nice," the rest of us will have some good natured fun at others' expense from time to time. And yes, anyone with a new, "dedicated" train room (myself included) is fair game for obvious, envious remarks. : )
Your needs & desires may vary but that's what I did.
dlm
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Dan,
Perhaps you and others can offer some experience or suggestions, or even speculations, for my problem.
THE SETUP:
I have an above garage space that will be a few inches over 16' x 23' - but that's under a 45 degree roofline that intersects the long walls at 54" above floor level. With this in mind I've had to plan a layout height ranging from 40" to 48", with a staging return loop with three passing tracks dropping from the 40" level to 37" (most of that will be below an end wall and curve around under the 48" area along one long wall.
The basic concept is that of a mythical southern Indiana branch line, the Big Fork and Diehl RR (reporting mark BFD), that leases engine service and critical area trackage rights with some class 1 lines (Wabash, Nickel Plate and possibly even C&O - I'd like to see a 2-8-8-2 dragging in empties and schlepping away 20-car coal drags, in addition to NKP Berks towing reefers stopping for re-icing and a Wabash P-1 4-6-4 heading up a train of blue heavyweight cars with a Bluebird drumhead at the end of the observation car), and has it's own out and back run from the big yard up to the mines and branch terminal, shuffling hoppers, reefers full of Buxom Melons, and cars of cement and limestone slabe as well as miscellaneous freight and local passenger service.
Along the West long wall, 40" level, track enters from staging loop via tunnel near North short wall and enters the long double ended interchange yard, passenger station, engine service area, shops and MoW yard at Big Fork, returning via balloon loop in southwest corner; West side of balloon loop also goes:
1) along West wall headed North into tunnel and begins down grade to connect to staging loop
2) between that track and the return side of the balloon loop begins 2% grade headed North, crossing North entrance from staging at 44", then East, doing a 35" radius climbing loop around the Piedmont peninsula (station, cement plant, limestone quarry, and a melon farm - the liftout access in the middle of it) crossing over itself at 48" and continuing East then South along East wall to a 33" baloon loop with a wye, small yard, engine terminal and station at Diehl at the south end; two coal mines are in the Northeast corner and along the outside (West) of the East side balloon. Various small industries such as stock watering, REA, coal and fuel dealers, brewery, produce distributor, steel fabricator, chicken packer, grain elevator, scrap yard, etc. are scattered around Big Fork, Piedmont and Diehl, offering lots of switching activity for BFnD way freights.
Stair access is in center of south short wall.
NOW - THE QUESTIONS: that East wall area at 48" height will have just 6" of vertical wall for backdrop before hitting the 45 degree slope of the ceiling (rises to 8 feet, then flat across the center)
I'm concerned about how to handle the transition from vertrical to slant (small radius coved? - and don't even mention the corners!), and wondering about lighting. Track lights sound attractive - mounted behind a valence perhaps. I'm thinking the backdrop color should be a fairly pale blue to reflect more light, but am concerned about complex shadows and color cast.
Our president, Heinrich "Big Harry" Diehl, leader of the Big Fork'n' Diehl, home of Silverplate Service, thanks you for your thoughts.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:
snip

It all depends ----
IF your viewing is all from a single location, then 'backdrop' scenery can cross the verticle to slant juncture without a lot of problem. But if the viewing is from several directions, you will have a lot of 'distortion' to try and explain/ live with.
Chuck D.

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On 6/19/2009 12:06 PM Steve Caple spake thus:

This is the only small part of your problems that I thought I'd comment on.
How about having the backdrop seamlessly make a transition* to the ceiling along that wall (gentle radius, as large as possible), and make that the "outward looking" edge of the layout? You know, the western edge, where the skies are not cloudy all day, etc. (Although surely the skies will look better with some nice big cumulus clouds in them.)
* I'm sorry, but "transition" was never meant to be a verb. (One doesn't "transition to" something; one makes a transition to it.)
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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David Nebenzahl wrote: [..]

Making nouns out of verbs and vice versa is easy and natural for English. (Actually, it's more accurate to think of "noun" and "verb" as positions in a sentence, that is, as syntactic functions rather than word classes or "parts of speech". English is a highly analytic language, much more like Chinese than Latin.) Many verbs were once used exclusively as nouns, and vice versa - they've just become widely used in both functions, is all, and sound perfectly natural now. Anglo-Saxon words usually have the same form for both, in fact. Latin words usually require a nominal or verbal suffix, but that requirement is disappearing as fewer and fewer speakers learn Latin, and the awareness of the Latin patterns fades.
Your objection to "transition" as a verb merely means that for you "to transition" is not yet a natural-sounding verb. I share your feelings, but am not as het up about it all.
cheers,
wolf k.
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On 6/19/2009 3:42 PM Wolf K spake thus:

>

>

OK. "Transition" I'll give you as an iffy case. But "grow" used as a transitive verb? *That* I'll fight you on!
(As in "we plan to grow our business".)
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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On Fri, 19 Jun 2009 16:02:42 -0700, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Er, uh, arguing with yourself?
BTW, many Iowa farmers grow corn. Pretty transitive, no? But "growing a business" bugs me for the biz school marketing speak flavor. If you hear anyone use the word "rebranding" without heavy sarcasm, smack the ignorant bastard down.
The REAL misuse is that beloved of DoD bureaucrats, using impact as a verb.
--
Steve

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David Nebenzahl wrote:

So what don't you grow in your garden?
:-)
wolf k.
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He grows plants. Very transitively.
Now you can complain about 'plants' being both a noun and a verb, as in 'he plants plants'.
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On 6/19/2009 6:25 PM Wolf K spake thus:

>

Hmm; I guess it's not precisely the use of "grow" as a verb (tr.), but its use with an improper object. It's OK to say "I'm growing some high-quality sinsemmila", but not OK to say "we're going to grow our marijuana dispensary business". Or at least it wasn't OK when I was growing up.
(OK, language is constantly changing*, yadda yadda ... )
* I remember when I took calculus finding that there is actually a formula governing the rate at which words change in a language.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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David Nebenzahl wrote:

[...]
It's the metaphor of business as a plant that offends me. That, and the implication that you can make things grow the way you want.
cheers,
wolf k.
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Wolf K wrote:

You are easily offended.
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You don't say what the distance from the track to the wall is.
One thing that comes to mind is don't run the track parallel to the wall under the break from vert to 45ฐ.
Put trees, hilly scenery, building flats or shallow buildings etc between the track and wall to break the line formed by the ceiling and wall, i.e., hide the straight line behind scenery. Make sure that the lighting doesn't cast shadows on the wall.
You name eastern RRs. The sky at the horizon should be nearly white (actually light gray).
--
Fred Lotte
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.stratos.net
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On 6/20/2009 11:15 AM Fred Lotte spake thus:

It would be better to eliminate the break entirely by coving it over. Often done in such situations using thin plywood, masonite, etc. (Or just by using drywall mud and tape.)
--
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