Fuller and Johnson FPE

Today was that rare thing, a bank holiday with nothing planned, so I decided
to drag an engine from its slumbers and have a tinker. I chose my 1913
Fuller & Johnson Farm Pump Engine which has probably not seen the light of
day for five years or more. Fresh fuel and going over with the oil can and
it started first swing - how dull! But I soon had something to play with as
it slowed nearly to a standstill before the governor demanded another hit,
sometimes too late to prevent stalling. This was quickly rectified by
cleaning up the catch plates and slightly increasing the spring tension on
the catch lever. After that it ran very nicely for an hour or so, a sharp
shower of rain doing nothing to put it off it's stroke. So I took some
pics, shut down and treated it to a wipe over with my favourite oily rag.
I am reminded what a nice engine the FPE is, the Americans have (had?) a
wonderful way of building things both cheaply and well, using just the right
amount of the right material in the right place - look at the front axle of
a model T Ford for a prime example. The run also reminded me that I should
perhaps attend to the knocking little end!
Pics (including a rare appearance of yours truly in new album on webshots
page below.
Reply to
Nick H
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BTW has anyone seen a copy of the new and expanded edition of Verne Kindschi's (sp?) F&J story - does it contain any more FPE info? Perhaps he has even revised his ideas about the evolution of the FPE in line with the piece I wrote in SEM a while ago ;-)
Reply to
Nick H
Hi Nick,
I have to admit that in my so far sheltered life I have not seen one of those before. A very interesting engine and the sort of thing I would dearly like to get hold of. Thanks for showing it!
Mark
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Reply to
Mark_Howard
"Mark_Howard" wrote >
It was its 'differentness' which attracted me, there are a few similar types in the 'States - Baker Monitor and Fairbanks Eclipse for instance - but as far as I know, nothing like it was ever made in the UK.
It was basically designed to do the work of a wind pump and the sales booklet is a delight . Eg; "Is it really worth having such a constant menace as a windmill on your farm, knowing all the time that today, or perhaps tomorrow, you or yours may meet the fate of the hundreds whose cases we have mentioned. Your wife, your little one, or you yourself may be the next one to be killed or crippled for life". It would also power "any machinery which is normally driven by hand" and this apparently enabled it to "keep the boys on the farm" by relieving them of many "disageeable chores" thus, rather than moving to the city, they would be "satisfied, contented, willing to follow in your footsteps, and finally settle down near you, to be a companion and staff in old age". There is pages of this sort of stuff - probably cured cancer as well!
Reply to
Nick H
A magnificently weird bit of kit, Nick, well worth dragging blinking into the light.
Is that big round thing carb or exhaust?
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
Glad you liked it - what about those excerpts from the 'Buy or Die' sales booklet then!
The "big round thing" is the fuel tank, suspended from the carb. The main exhaust is by piston controlled port in the cylinder wall and has a simple mushroom shaped muffler. The conventional valve controlled exhaust port in the head has no silencing at all but only makes a gentle huffing noise. The 'shoe box' shaped thing should house both trembler coil and battery but, as you probably noticed, I was using a car battery (with light bulb in series) which won't fit indoors.
Reply to
Nick H
Interesting how they solved things early on, especially on agricultural engines that were made with simplicity of running in mind.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn

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