Hylomar Jointing compound?


Hello all, I wonder if anyone can help?
I'm about to get the head off my Lister STW2 and replace a head gasket
(2.50 pounds for a head gasket sounds good to me, I got some spares
too), and the manual tells me I need some Hylomar PL32M - not been able
to find a supplier yet - is there a modern equivalent?
Many thanks in advance
Neil
Reply to
Neil Brown
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Pretty sure this is the 'official' designation of ornery blue hylomar. Should be available from halfords though last time I was in there the shelves of product to make your car nice and shiny seemed to be gradually ousting anything actually useful.
Reply to
Nick H
Are you sure? My book says Wellseal. Now that *is* getting harder to find.
Hylomar for the bottom of the cylinder barrel.
Cheers Tim
Tim Leech Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
Reply to
timleech
Good job too you, can overdose on that stuff
-- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Reply to
John Stevenson
And Hylomar for some of the other gaskety joints too, and but yes, it says Wellseal for some of the threaded bits - I thought regular threadlock would do for Wellseal?
Reply to
Neil Brown
I think RS do it - would this be the stuff? Spec looks promising
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Cheers
Neil
Reply to
Neil Brown
No.
Cheers Tim
Tim Leech Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
Reply to
timleech
That was spirit based IIRC, Bedfords always used it before changing over to Hylomar when it became slightly less expensive and easier to buy.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Prepair Ltd
Yes I think that's it. Comparing tech data sheets for universal blue and aerograde on
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confirm or otherwise.
Reply to
Nick H
Ahh, in case it's handy, have found a source of Wellseal
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Reply to
Neil Brown
Which manual do you have? Mine, the full ring-bound workshop manual (8th edition 1987) says:-
Cylinder shims and gasket - water cooled engines (STW) Wellseal Lightly coat the recess on the head where the joints seat and the side of the counter bore. Place each shim in the recess and coat it in turn and finally place the thick gasket and coat it. The top of the cylinder is not coated. Use very little compound.
For cylinder head nuts and top thread of studs: Wellseal Dip nuts and coat stud threads and area of cylinder head or rocker bracket in contact with nuts.
For Bottom of cylinders: Hylomar PL32M Coat cylinder on jointing face, stick joint to it and coat joint.
As these engines, more especially the aircooled versions, tend to be a bit self-basting, I reckon it's worth following their directions closely. That way you can curse the manufacturer's design when it leaks, not yourself for skimping the job
HTH Tim
Tim Leech Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
Reply to
timleech
Good point! Many thanks for that, plus the extra info, got my Wellseal coming in the post.
Reply to
Neil Brown
Gentlemen,
When I refit/replace gaskets I tend to use nothing more than a good grease and touch wood I never have a problem. The tip was passed onto me by a long gone friend when my first engine a Lister D had a leaking head gasket, I put it in the oven to anneal it then smeared both sides with grease before re-fitting it never leaked again and now I grease all gaskets including the paper ones. Its also cheaper than bought products.
Martin P I know annealing softens the copper and helped but the grease fills the cracks. :-)

Reply to
Campingstoveman
Not a bad method for general low-tech stuff, but the stresses on a Lister ST gasket are probably a bit higher than on a D
Actually, the recommendation for the ST (air cooled) head rings *is* grease, but not for the STW. There's got to be a reason for that.
Cheers Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
I'm quite surprised at the complexity of the instructions on treating each gasket in a different way and to use different compounds in different places. Probably written with the advice of the sealant manufacturers ;o))
Most of our engines are not operating at anything like their rated output and don't get as hot or as cold as they once did, both of these factors will contribute to the self basting (I like that!) facility.
Since silicone sealant appeared on the scene about twenty years ago, I've never willingly used anything else and as it will readily withstand 600c unless exposed to a flame, I use it on doubtful head gaskets, too!
However, I rarely use it as the maker intended. I take a SMALL amount on both finger and thumb and work it into the gasket on both sides. Then I put it aside to cure. 24 hours later, I have a paper gasket with a rubberised face both sides and they simply don't leak, even if the cases are less than perfect. This works on second hand paper gaskets too as long as they are sound to begin with.
Occasionally, you'll get a paper gasket that has shrunk. You can resurrect these by letting them soak in boiling water for an hour. When the water is cool, they'll have stretched and will fit the cases. Prepare as above.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn,
Reply to
J K Siddorn

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