LPG conversion

Does anyone know about the above subject with respect to a Villiers MK10? I
have a fuel controller (looks like a gas bottle regulator but with a priming
button) and what looks like part of a Villiers carb containing only the
butterfly throttle and one huge jet directly connected to a fulham nozzle.
Is that all there is to it - does the controller automatically regulate the
amount of gas according to throttle opening - or do I need any other bits?
The reason for my question is that I was wondering if I could turn the
Danish army gen set I aquired years ago into a useful member of society
(petrol gens for occasional/stand by use are a dead loss as unleaded seems
to go stale quicker than a pint of milk).
Reply to
Nick H
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Nick,
As long as you keep reminding me I have somewhere inside the four walls a service manual for a LPG powered villiers Genny from the GPO. I will look it out this weekend.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
c> Nick,
c> As long as you keep reminding me I have somewhere inside the four walls c> a service manual for a LPG powered villiers Genny from the GPO. I will c> look it out this weekend.
c> Martin P
Thanks Martin, that should help no end. How often do I need to remind you ;-)
nickh=== Posted with Qusnetsoft NewsReader 2.2.0.8
Reply to
nickh
At least once a week :-))
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
Nick, I have converted a Villiers MK12 to run on lpg with hot tube ignition, works a treat, all I did to the carb was connect a regulated supply of gas to where the fuel line would go on. It will plod away all day with very little heat needed on the hot tube once it is warmed up. It took a little time to get the gas setting right to the carb but now it only takes a few minutes to get it up and running. I now use a small (1/4" bsp) pneumatic flow control valve to meter the gas to the carb, I find the fine adjustment of this makes for easier control.
Cheers, MartinH
Reply to
Martin Hirst
The easy no effort solution to this problem is to nip down to your local small airfield and buy some 100LL AVGAS. It's just like the old 5* fuel as near as makes no odds, and is devoid of all the octane boosting aromatics in modern petrol that account for its short shelf life - AVGAS will last for years.
The airfield will probably be quite used to filling small containers, when I was involved motorcycle race teams used to buy the stuff.
Reply to
Julian
"Julian" wrote
Interesting idea, we have Denham just up the road. Of course heavily leaded petrol apparently brings its own problems in engines not originally designed to use it (I have no idea whether a 1960's or so Villiers MK10 falls into that catagory).
BTW is the rapid deterioration of unleaded caused by evaporation of the volatile aromatics or is there some chemical change over time - ie will it last better in a sealed jerry can than a vented tank?
Reply to
Nick H
Found that manual yet Martin? ;-)
Reply to
Nick H
Well it's a bit more than an idea, I've used it in motorcycle and a car now that tend to get mothballed for the winter.
we have Denham just up the road. Of course heavily leaded
It's not actually 'heavily leaded.' The LL bit in 100LL is for low lead - maybe on a par with lead levels in the old 5*, but I don't have any specific figures as such. I'll have a bet that you won't get any problems, the most likely is lead salts fouling the plug(s), however on aero engines it's only the lower plugs that tend to suffer, gravity stops the problem with the uppers.
I'm not too sure, certainly the aromatics (now to include dissolved propanes AIUI) that enhance octane depart the fuel in short order. My vehicles knock like a bugger on fuel that's been in over winter. I suppose it must last better in a sealed can but I've never conducted tests, I've noticed however that a proper plastic jerry can swells alarmingly when it's left in a hot shed in summer!
Julian.
Reply to
Julian

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