does anyone know anything about medeco sitekeys?

Hi - my new dorm is locked up with Medeco Sitekeys. It is incredibly
irritating - because my key only opens up some doors - leaving me a
really really slow route that I have to take to get to my room. So -
I'd like to try to make a copy of someone else's sitekey. Oh - and the
managers of the building won't help me out with this :( Anyways - my
sitekey has two contacts on it - both of which I believe are isolated
from the actual key. I pulled off the cover of the key - and there is
some little round cylinder thing in it - which only has two contacts
on it (it looks like an oversized watch battery) My first impulse was
that it was probably just a diode - so I tried flippign it upside down
(one contact on top the other's on the bottom) and that didn't work at
all. So - my multimeter is being sent to me from back home and should
arrive soon - so I'll be able to do further tests with it then - but
in the meantime - does anyone know how these work? BTW - there is some
writing on the battery like thing. This is what I could make out:
1993
Dallas
0033 registered 03
C6 91
5E70000C23D7
(various small numbers that I can't make out)
Anyways - anyone have any advice? Thanks!
Reply to
Michael
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What you found was a Dallas Semiconductor 'chip in a can'. The chip inside is sealed in some kind of epoxy to prevent reverse engineering and tampering. Unless you have their software and probably a password you don't have a chance. It's part of an access control system...looks like it's working. BBE.
Michael wrote: > > Hi - my new dorm is locked up with Medeco Sitekeys. It is incredibly > irritating - because my key only opens up some doors - leaving me a > really really slow route that I have to take to get to my room. So - > I'd like to try to make a copy of someone else's sitekey. Oh - and the > managers of the building won't help me out with this :( Anyways - my > sitekey has two contacts on it - both of which I believe are isolated > from the actual key. I pulled off the cover of the key - and there is > some little round cylinder thing in it - which only has two contacts > on it (it looks like an oversized watch battery) My first impulse was > that it was probably just a diode - so I tried flippign it upside down > (one contact on top the other's on the bottom) and that didn't work at > all. So - my multimeter is being sent to me from back home and should > arrive soon - so I'll be able to do further tests with it then - but > in the meantime - does anyone know how these work? BTW - there is some > writing on the battery like thing. This is what I could make out: > > 1993 > Dallas > 0033 registered 03 > C6 91 > 5E70000C23D7 > (various small numbers that I can't make out) > > Anyways - anyone have any advice? Thanks!
Reply to
Billy B. Edwards Jr.
does the words "access control" mean anything to ya ? they should... think about it...
red flags everywhere
Reply to
"Keyman
Life is a bitch ain't it - almost as bad as having to go thru a magnetometer to get on a plane!
Reply to
Jim Gaynor
Second point first. It's not "pointless" access control if it does what the OWNERS/MANAEGMENT of the building wants. If you lock the drawer in your desk, but don't store anything of value there, a third party may deem it pointless. You, on the other hand will be greatly upset if someone routinely opens that lock, even if they do no damage and steal nothing.
Maybe they want to avoid traffic through a spacific corridor that was too noisy for the occupants of that area. Maybe there's a fire-safety rule that regulates what passaages are open. It's even possible that they just want to discourage running through a straight path at top speed. Most likely they want to route people past a guard station or camera for security purposes.
Try asking the management why it's the way it is and you may be suprised. We know, of course that YOU would never steal anything or smuggle anything in or out. Oh. Wait. You already said that you want to filch or fake a key, showing that you have a propensity to disregard rules.
Now, as to the two contact chip: Dallas Semi has (quite ingeniously) designed a series of chips with a two wire bus. In essence, voltage is applied which charges a capaciter which then powers the device long enough to respond to a few read/write cycles. I have several devices using that design.
Sincerely,
Daniel
Reply to
dbs
From your perspective. Obviously not from that of the person who implemented the access control.
It's hardly as though someone who wanted to break in somewhere would say: Listen I really need to break into this place to steal some stuff, can you tell me how to.........
If this were so easy I would wager you would have already done it to avoid the inconvenience of the long walk to your room.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
Well - first of all - the keys seperate the male and female wings of the dorm after two 2am. Annoyingly enough - this system sometimes messes up and won't let you through a door during an allowed time in the middle of the day. It's a major annoyance :( Do you know if the system uses a rolling code or a static code (hopefully those are the right terms - what I mean is does it just give a simple code - or is it something more complicated than that? If it was just a simple code - I could probably figure out the code with a oscilliscope and then replicate it with an AVR (8 bit uC).
Reply to
Michael
What 'Michael' may not know is that the campus locksmiths have been following this thread and are probably laughing their heads off.
Reply to
Peter
I got a campus locksmith that I go visit with now and then, some of the tales he tells, are so out there, that no one would believe them...
--Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--

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