new addition collected today!!!!

just got back with my lister diesel engine. Now it's time to work out what i've got. Maybe you guys can help me out.
There is no engine model written anywhere. the nameplate gives the engine
number and the power (6hp). from what I have seen on the web, i guess it is a CS model, as it has a hand-wheel that adjusts the compression ratio. Any ideas how you are supposed to use this?!
Engine started ok, and ran quite happily (although it looked a lot faster than 650rpm to me). It is very smokey at start up, and it 'misses' a lot even after it has warmed up - is this normal (governor-related?) or is something wrong?
The other question (bit embarrasing) is - how do you stop the thing?! moving what i think is the governor by hand doesnt seem to make any difference at all. So the only way we could stop it was to adjust the compression ratio to the 'leak to atmosphere' position, and even then it fired every now and again, so we had to use some 3x2 timber to apply engine-braking to the flywheel.
Anyone got any idea of the weight? I read somewhere that it was around 400kg - it was certainly heavy to lift off the pickup!!
Cheers
Ivan
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The 'CS' diesels generally had spoked flywheels apart from the very late ones and Start-O-Matic engines.
They also had external pushrods which no other Lister diesel had.
CD diesels were totally enclosed, had solid flywheels and a lever-operated. change-over valve.
JP or 9/1 had a single solid flywheel and screw-in/out compression change-over.
VA diesel was air-cooled and no compression change-over.
FR is again totally enclosed and has lever change-over valves.
Stopping the engine requires the fuel to be shut off by moving the pump rack against the governor spring back to zero fuel. Don't use the change-over valve as you'll burn the seating and replacements are not easy to find.
They take a while to run down from speed, but should not be firing at all if the rack is right back. The rack itself is usually marked "STOP" and an arrow to show which way to shut it down.
Peter
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Thanks Peter! That's really helpful advise. It's definitely a LISTER CS, on that basis. It has the external pushrods, and the screw compression adjuster. I didnt see any 'STOP' signs, but I'll have a look at the weekend in daylight.
Regards
Ivan
wrote:

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Make sure the governor and rack are free, they do stick if unused for a while.
Stop direction is the opposite to the governor spring pull direction.
Peter
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The official way to stop a CS is to lift the governor lever handle - a small (3") handle located just below the fuel pump mounting and linked in with the top of the rod which falls to the governor bell crank on the camshaft housing - let me know if you need a scanned picture of the part. The handle operates an eccentric which pushes the fuel pump rack towards the fuel filter and cuts off the fuel.
The emergency stop is to operate the decompresor (officially the valve lifter stud) - holds open the exhaust valve therefore no compression, but fuel still gets squirted in every revolution making for a smoky start next time.
David Edgington markets a comprehensive little handbook for the CS - instructions and spare parts list.
I have found to my cost that many CS parts can be still obtained brand new - thanks to Peter Scales for putting me in touch with a source of great wealth depletion :-)
writes

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Don't mention it :-)
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Peter Scales

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writes

ISTR that the CS singles weigh something in the region of 730 lbs (332 Kg) dry.
Paul Evans probably has a PDF file of the handbook/manual at his wonderful museum website http://www.internalfire.com /
Regards
Pete
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 15:44:12 +0000, Peter Scales

I don't think the handbook gives specifications, but the handbook is well worth having for the other info.
The factory data sheets for the water-cooled diesels and some of the petrol engines are at:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Technical /
Models covered are: A, AK, B, BK, D, DK, F, FK, G1, G1K, G2, G2K, L, LK, CD, CE, 3/1, 5/1, 10/2, FR, JP1, JP2 JP3 JP4.
The 5/1 sheets are:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Technical/51P1data.htm http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Technical/51P2data.htm http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Technical/51P3data.htm http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Technical/51P4data.htm
All the sheets are split into four pieces to make them easier to print and download.
Kind regards,
Peter
Peter Forbes Prepair Ltd Luton, UK email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk home: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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