City of Truro

Being totally new to this group and living overseas (USA), has there been a recently offered "City Of Truro" in OO that is an operating version versus
the various plastic model kits offered over the years.
Jim Hollis Hurst, TX
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Jim Hollis wrote:

I'm afraid not, although one has been mentioned in various "wish lists" in the last few years, there are no current plans to produce one by any of the major manufacturers.
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Jim Hollis said the following on 24/09/2006 17:26:

Nothing RTR currently (didn't Hornby do one years ago?), but Branchlines do a motorising kit for the Dapol City that can turn into a decent model, with a bit of extra work on the body.
--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk /
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Don't think they did 'City of Truro', more likely your thinking of the R354 'Lord of the Isles' done in 1961 and again in 1971.

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On Mon, 25 Sep 2006 12:27:03 GMT, "Thorodin"

And again this year.
It's one of my all-time favourite engines. Mine is in O-scale built from a DJB kit released for GWR 150 in 1985. Sheesh - that's 22 years ago.
A OO City might be a popular model, spanning from the Edwardian era to preservation. But I suspect the variations of Duke, curly and straight framed Bulldog, and Dukedog might sell more and could use common tooling.
They'll never make my actual favourite, the River class.

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"Christopher

Twould derail on standard hornby track and drummond would come stomping down in his bug (painted a weathered white as befits his/its resting place) and stoutly maintain that it would be fine if it was run on properly laid 75 finescale.
Anyway its ugly. ;-)
Ken
Now when are they doing a M7 in the livery it was born with? or any pregrouping (except for that ukky yellow terrier).
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On Mon, 25 Sep 2006 22:53:50 +0100, "Ken Wilson"

Not that River - the GWR double framed 2-4-0s that were rebuilt from 2-2-2s in the mid 1890s. They looked a bit like larger wheeled Barnums.
They started off as Beyer Peacock singles in the 1850s (in fact the first engines by the then new company), to a Daniel Gooch design because Swindon wasn't building standard gauge engines yet - basically a standard gauge version of his larger broad gauge singles.
They were renewed by Armstrong, still as singles 20 years later. He replaced the Gooch motion with Stevenson's and the inside sandwich frames with plate frames, retaining the outside Sandwich frames.
How much of the original there was in the renewal I don't know, but the 1890-something rebuild was genuine.
Imagine something like a large-wheeled Dean Goods with a 2-4-0 wheel arrangement and outside slotted sandwich frames.

Not this one.
The ugliest engine is a toss up between the Bulleid Q1 and the Ivatt Flying Pig. A took an American friend to the Bluebell line for his first ride behind British steam, and he was disgusted with the Q1 so we got off at Horsted Keynes and waited for the next one, behind a Wainwright SECR locomotive.

They destroyed the other LBSC 0-6-0T to make the Thomas moulds. And don't forget the Dean and Caledonian Singles. Although they made a pig's ear of the Dean's front end by cutting off chunks of the outside frame to give enough side play to the bogie.
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"Christopher

Aah!
Well - that's why i read this ng.

I thought that ran distinctly toy like and was for the collectors only?
note from some advert that bachmann america do three v early models and every month i think i will sit down and see what they could be converted to.
ken
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On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 00:14:31 +0100, "Ken Wilson"

Their Norris 4-2-0 (King of Prussia and similar sets) actually ran on the Birmingham and Gloucester - surprisingly they worked freight over the Lickey incline.
Bachman produced two versions of this. If you can get one, you want the early version with a tiny motor mounted vertically in the firebox. For a tiny, cheap, junk engine these were very good. They picked up off the bogie as well as the driving wheels, which meant a flexible wheelbase so running was utterly reliable.
The later runs had a tiny mechanism in the tender which was shorter than an N-gauge tank engine, These were rigid, pickup was poor and the motor crap.
They also did a couple of other engines. One was actually a standard Stevenson 0-4-0 with a locally added pilot truck turning it into a 2-4-0, and a locally built roofed tender to keep the wood dry. Yes, it ran as a wood-burner not the original coke-burner. This has the same grotty tender drive mechanism, and the driving wheels which should have outside cranks and coupling rod are uncoupled. I made the mistake of buying one once to try and convert it back to the Stevenson original.
Can't tell you about the others, but they all seem to have used the same tender drive. I wouldn't recommend them.
The trouble is that these are HO and look silly alongside the Triang/Hornby Rocket or the Trix Adler (a 3.8mm scale Stevenson Patentee 2-2-2).

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{Bachman]
/chomp/
That's actually correct: the prototype modelled is the Stephenson 0-4-0 sold to the Camden & Amboy, as modified by John Stevens and Isaac Dripps with the pilot truck and wood-burning equipment and with the side rods removed: the engine is preserved in the Smithsonian Institute in that condition - as "John Bull", a name it naver seems to have carried in ervice. It's saild to still be runnable.

The Planets (2-2-0) and Samsons (0-4-0) came in a variety of sizes, so there's some scope for modifying the John Bull as one of the smaller ones.
Of course, if you were modelling the Camden & Amboy in HO you'd have to regauge the model: the C&A was 4'10" gauge :)
--
Andy Breen ~ Speaking for myself, not the University of Wales
"your suggestion rates at four monkeys for six weeks"
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"Andrew Robert Breen" wrote

The C&A is the only US line that has ever interested me as a modelling proposition. Not just because anything pre-1860 interests me as a matter of principle as so few people model it (my pet project is the London & Greenwich circa 1840) but because it ran two of the most outrageous locos ever: the Norris 6-2-0, of which photos exist - long crank rods, low boiler, huge driving wheels and a greenhouse perched where the cab should be (it's on the cover of the Loco Profiles book on the Norrises, which also covers the Lickey locos of the Birmingham & Gloucester, including correcting the myth that it was a Norris that exploded and put the crew in Bromsgrove cemetery); and the Camden & Amboy Monster which was a freight loco - either 0-8-0 or 0-10-0, I forget - which had some bizarre indirect crank drive mechanism. Truly, the Americans tried everything, once. New Jersey before it turned into shopping malls would make an interesting scenic research project too.
Tony Clarke
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If you've not got Mike Sharman's "The Crampton Locomotive" then you'll want to get it. It's got quite a comprehensive section on the C&A 6-2-0s. Amazing devices. The prototype - the "John Stevens" - was even odder than the production batches, if you'll credit that.

0-10-0, I think.

Yup. Sounds like a wonderful idea.
--
Andy Breen ~ Not speaking on behalf of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Feng Shui: an ancient oriental art for extracting
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"Andrew Robert Breen" wrote

You could then use P4 standards for an HO model. Who's going to worry about a missing 0.5mm? :-)
--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk /
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I think that by mentioning P4 you've just answered that question :)
--
Andy Breen ~ Not speaking on behalf of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Feng Shui: an ancient oriental art for extracting
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Salv

of
boiler,
either
it
project
Didnt Ian Rice do an article on ictorian oddities some years ago in which photos of his models where displayed, some of those babies where really strange! Val Beowulf
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wrote:

Mike Sharman? One the hobby's innovators. We have him to thank for compensation - although others have introduced different methods, his Flexichas system was the pioneer. Also he was the first to transfer weight from the tender to the rear axle of the locomotive.

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Almost certainly Sharman - his articles in RM in the mid-70s were an absolute revelation.
Nice bit of Sharmanism here:
http://www.scalerail.freeuk.com/images/MikeSharman004.jpg
--
Andy Breen ~ Not speaking on behalf of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Feng Shui: an ancient oriental art for extracting
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On Tue, 3 Oct 2006 16:49:13 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@aber.ac.uk (Andrew Robert Breen) wrote:

Nice. I like the early stuff. I think his were the first Cramptons I saw modelled.
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Salv>

It may well have been Mr Sharman, there was one model which stuck in my minds eye, which was a loco with an oscillating crank driving both axles which was centered between the two axles in question, it was a superb model :) Beowulf
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wrote:

I think that was also one of Crampton's patents. He wasn't just into big boilers and speed, but also into balancing.
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