Connectors for Tortoise point motors

Can anyone help?
I bought some Tortoise point motors recently. I want to make it easy to change them in the event of something going wrong with one.
The suggested method of connecting is to solder wires to each of the 8 'terminals', but I want to make the connection by plug (or should that be socket). The literature suggests that I buy a 'standard' PCB 10 point edge connector. The Tortoise connection seems to be the old style something like that used for putting 'cards' into some of the older (386, etc) PC's so is quite large by today's standards.
I've tried looking on the Maplins web site and am even more confused than when I started (easily done at my age!) by the profusion of different devices. Anyone know where I can get these from?
I do have a 'backup' method which is to solder the wires to a 9 way D plug and then connect to a 9 way socket but that is twice the amount of work compared to soldering just once to an edge connector.
As always thanks in advance
--
Mike Hughes
A Taxi driver licensed for London and Brighton
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Hi Mike,

C&L supply a suitable 8-pin connector (Part No C1541 - Snap on Connector for Tortoise point motor):
http://www.lcpinternational.co.uk/cl/#PointOperation
Hope this helps,
Regards,
Dave Searle http://www.lbscr.org.uk
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2005 22:01:08 +0100, Mike Hughes

All Components sell them.
http://www.allcomponents.co.uk
Two problems. 1) it's not quite the right size and 2) it has solder connections so you end up with at least one soldering job anyway.
Personally I solder 8 shorts wires to the Tortoise and then connect via a screw block connector.
Depending on what type of point your using and if you can turn the layout upside down then changing a tortoise is a slightly tricky job anyway so having a quick release electrical connection doesn't make the job much quicker.
Nigel
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2005 22:01:08 +0100, Mike Hughes

As I couldn't get the desired edge connectors, I used straight Locking Headers. I needed to drill out every second hole to fit the pins, and drill new holes where the originals holes were offset, but it seemed to work OK. I did modify the locking bits on the Nylon housings to reduce the force required.
I'm not sure if these were the ones I got or not, but they looked like this.
http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=HM3418&CATID=&keywords=header&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&ProdCodeOnly=&Keyword1=&Keyword2=&pageNumber=&priceMin=&priceMax=&SUBCATIDhttp://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=HM3438&CATID=&keywords=header&SPECIAL=&form=KEYWORD&ProdCodeOnly=&Keyword1=&Keyword2=&pageNumber=&priceMin=&priceMax=&SUBCATID Regards,
Stuart
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Mike Hughes wrote:

The convention is to put the plug on the removable item and the socket on the "live" connection - saves having a live plug wandering about the countryside.

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