Poxy Peco point motors

Bastards, about one in four will not move the point whatever you do with it. Test as much as you like beforehand, drill as carefully as you want, and
still the little sods sit there smugly going "bzz" and not moving at all. Guy
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Have you removed the 'latching spring'?

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On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 12:22:04 +0100, "Keith Patrick"

No. Without that the microswitch pushes the rod back to dead centre. Guy
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What microswitch?
Jeff
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The one that switches the supply to the point frog. Guy
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Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

Yes, but what type of microswitch?
Jeff
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A Peco PL-15, I don't know of another microswitch that would fit (the PL-13 is a sliding contact switch and IME has too much drag). Guy
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Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

I have never had any problems with Peco point motors, even using the extended pin version and mounting then below the base board.
How are you driving the motors, is there enough current available from whatever you are driving then from, or is the wiring run way too long, or are you using a gauge of wire that is too thin?
Jeff
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wrote:

Same here, all mounted below baseboard but no pin, no microswitch either. To check if its microswitch, can you swap a working with non working and see if working stops and non working does. But would agree more likely current. Seem to remember small Hornby struggled but guagemaster threw easily.
cheers, Simon
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Always use a CDU for solenoid motors. A small increase in voltage gives a large inprovement as the energy stored is proportional to the square of the voltage.
MBQ
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wrote:

I use a latching relay from Maplin instead of a microswitch on Peco point motors. They are pretty cheap, work extremely well using the feeds from the passing contact switch and provide Double Pole Double Throw. This is they: http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo7529 having said all that, I prefer Seep motors with the integrated switch but have had to use some Peco because of space problems (I model in N and only PECO fit side by side under a scissors crossing. Even with Seep I use the latching relays if I need more than one switched pole.
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wrote:

What's going to hold the blades in place if he does that?
MBQ
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The point motor. The spring is only there to hold the blades over if you move the point by hand
wrote:

What's going to hold the blades in place if he does that?
MBQ
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wrote:

Peco point motors do not latch in place. if you remove the over centre spring from the points then the blades wil be able to flap about all over the place.
MBQ
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Yes, and that makes them easier to move when combined with a point motor. At the ends of it's travel, the point motor holds the switch blade against the stock rail. If you dont use a point motor, and push them over by hand, the spring holds the switch rail against the stock rail. You remove the spring when using point motors, as it requires extra pressure to move the switch rails, and this is often a cause of poorly operating point motors.
wrote:

Peco point motors do not latch in place. if you remove the over centre spring from the points then the blades wil be able to flap about all over the place.
MBQ
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wrote:

How?
There is no latching mechanism to hold anything in place if you use a Peco solenoid and remove the over centre spring.
MBQ
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On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 21:43:51 +1200, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

I've used Peco point motors since the days before they introduced the plastic framed version. (haven't bought any in the last decade) I've never had a dud one other than one with a dead coil in a batch of second-hand ones and that was obviously cooked.
Mounting them separately from the turnout requires very careful precision alignment, angle, vertical and horizontal. The mounting bases (PL9?) can bind if they are screwed too tightly. Generally I mount mine directly to the turnout, with a piece of card under the turnout to cover the big hole. The card also makes it possible to lift them again later after ballasting. I even have point motors throwing two of Peco's cheap switches (frog and turnout sequencing), one on one end of a double slip!
I also have a few H&M point motors (with switches added). These move anything - sometimes I think the baseboard jumps and the points stay in their original position. ;-)
Greg.P.
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I use Gaugemaster SEEP motors. They are also fiddly to install and adjust. Once their position is fixed, it's possible to adjust the throw by carefully bending the actuating rod.
A Capacitor Dischage Unit (Gaugemaster 11 from Hatton's, or make your own) delivers a strong momentary burst of DC current, which gets rid of the AC buzzing. Even so, with more than two point motors wired in parallel it usually needs an extra push on the (on)-off-(on) switch to get them all to change completely.
The disadvantage with SEEP motors is you have to solder your own leads to the PCB. I find drilling a small hole through the solder tag and slipping the wire through the hole before soldering makes for a better connection.
--
Martin S.

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MartinS wrote:

You guys seem to ba having a lot of trouble with your electrically-operated point motors. I don't have any trouble at all with my air-operated ones.
--
Jane



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I don't have any problems with servos, which are cheaper than solenoid motors but require a little more electronics (can still be cheaper than solenoid + CDU).
MBQ
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