Model Rail 2005

Went to it today, and managed to spend 6 hours going round all the
stalls, so my legs ache a bit!
Anyone else been yet? Must say I was quite impressed with the layouts on
show, as usual, though the show had one of the rear halls, so it took a
bit of walking from the main entrance. There was of course a sizeable
trade presence too.
Mind you my wallets also hurting a tad as well. Bought a Bachmann 37, a
couple of wagons and a Hornby Black 5.
Speaking of the 5, after I took it out the box when I got home, it seems
to be remarkably light (compared to Bachmann locos at least), anyone
else noticed this? I'll give it a good run in tomorrow, though I suspect
I may have to add a bit of weight to it, but I'll see how it goes.
I also had my first chance to inspect the Hornby Live Steam A4, and I
must say I was very impressed, it seems to have a good turn of speed and
haulage capability, sounds, and indeed smells right, it just misses the
sulphur smell from the coal! Though it seems to take a lot of practice,
control wise, I had a go and it was a right b*gg*r, at least at first
attempt. But the Hornby staff managed it ok, so I suppose its just a
question of practice, even compelled me to buy one, but not yet......
Reply to
James Christie
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I can't help noticing that Bachmann is making more and more use of die-casting to increase the weight of their locomotives. With any luck they'll go the whole hog one day and produce a die-cast body as well.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Now, that would be a novelty. ;-)
Reply to
MartinS
In message , kim writes
If I remember correctly, die-cast items tend to deteriorate over the years, breaking and degenerating into a kind of powder at the break lines, like a kind of metal fatigue.
Reply to
John Sullivan
"John Sullivan" wrote
A symptom of using impure materials. Mazak needs its tin content to be 99.9% pure or it does indeed degrade, but many pre-WW2 diecast items have survived unscathed where impurities in the metal mix have been avoided.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
In message , John Sullivan writes
Good grief! That hasn't been a problem since pre-war days! Called various names both here and USA, and caused by impurities in the metal. Said to have been cured during WWII, when higher quality castings were required for 'the war effort'.
Reply to
Graeme Eldred
I still have the following Hornby-Dublo diecast locomotives - one DUCHESS OF MONTROSE (converted to 2-rail), two 8F 2-8-0s and a BR 2-6-4T; no sign of metal fatigue on any of them.
Reply to
David Costigan
In message , David Costigan writes
That is because they are all post war locos, by which time the problem had been cured.
Reply to
Graeme Eldred
I was surprised to find that one of my EFE trucks (Atkinson artic, Tate & Lyle) had suffered warpage and cracking of both parts of the diecast chassis, from just sitting in a display case - nowhere near a window.
Reply to
MartinS
How old is it?
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Under 10 years. Maybe it was a faulty batch of Mazak; a rear mudguard also broke off while I was handling it.
Reply to
MartinS
That's worrying. If the problem is widespread it will affect the value of all EFE models.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
that one of my EFE trucks (Atkinson artic, >>>> Tate & Lyle) had suffered warpage and cracking of both parts of the >>>> diecast chassis, from just sitting in a display case - nowhere near >>>> a window. >>> >>> How old is it? >> >> Under 10 years. Maybe it was a faulty batch of Mazak; a rear mudguard >> also broke off while I was handling it. > >That's worrying. If the problem is widespread it will affect the value of >all EFE models.
Mazak is, at best, horrible stuff. I've had cars where the brightwork was laid on Mazak, and one or two where it was used for door or wing mirror mountings. I eneded up buying a lot of replacement mirrors. Then there's the pin-holing.
Foul stuff.
Reply to
ANDREW ROBERT BREEN
I have two of these live steam A4s. They have both been back for attention, but they are brilliant when running properley, although there is a learning curve to operate them. I have ordered a rolling road, not the current Hornby one as they are releasing an improved version in the spring. This will enable me to learn the characteristics of each loco without them flying off the track.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Heath
I was up visiting family in Edinburgh that weekend so I popped over on the Saturday. It was certainly very busy! A good, wide selection of layouts, and a lot of traders - even my local shop (C&G Model Railways, Darlington) made the long trip to Glasgow. I parted company with some cash for a Heljan 47 bodyshell (47212 in Railfreight Petroleum, a donor for a future repaint), plus various transfers and detailing parts. On the transfers front I saw something very interesting - the recently-unveiled First Rail development Mk3s (pictures here:
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can be modelled courtesy of Replica Railways! In the space of little over a week Replica have managed to get the transfers on the market so I got myself a pair and a Hornby FGW Mk3 to put them on and it looks pretty damn good, something different for the layout. Slightly tricky to fit though, in that all the windows have been cut-out in advance, but the droplights in the door haven't, so make sure you've got a good sharp blade to cut them out with, and to cut around the step board (is that the right name?) beneath each door. All in all, a good event though it was pretty packed in the few hours I was there.
Reply to
Rich Mackin
practice,
The Hornby Grange and the Bachmann Hall were both on display. The Grange looked excellent, but I felt that the Hall didn't look quite right. I can't put my finger on it, but there seemed something rather clumsy about it. What do others think?
Andy Kirkham Glasgow
Reply to
Andy Kirkham

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