Motorising N gauge points (generic could be same as with OO!)

Evening all
I am in the process of tracklaying on a new mini layout. It fatures 3 points, which I want to automate the control of (ie. not by using my big
hand!)
Although previously I have used Peco point motors, I have found them a nightmare to install properly and get accessory switch to work, only to find that they dont fire properly (I am using a CDU) and trains derail!. Probably all due to my lack of skills installign them!
Anyway, for the new layout I am toying with the idea of using wire in tube. Does anyone have any pictures or documents (ie a website!) that will give me a basic idea of how the wire in tube works, how I can integrate it with a switch to change the frog polatity? Also, do I need a spring somewhere to keep the wire taught and stop the point slipping back?
If anyone has any piccies posted of a layout under construction showing wire in tube that would be really helpful...
Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have a look at Modratec's website http://modratec.com .
--

Regards

John



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Richard,
There are a number of ways that you can utilise the wire in tube method.
One is to use a mecanical lever and crank, but I found this to be over complex and expensive in time and effort. Running long lengths of wire and tube to the baseboard edges and having to move around the layout to change them.
Instead I dumped all my Peco motors and bought Seeps. My main problems were to do with the way the Pecos were fitted. If you fixed them to the underside of the points, huge square holes had to be cut in the baseboard letting in ballast and all manner of nasty bits. If you fixed them under the baseboard, you had the headache of cutting a traversing slot, the flanges never bent correctly, and switch operation was not too reliable.
I bought some fine brass rod, and a suitable tube from the local model shop, the tube outside diameter is about 1.5mm and the rod 1mm. Next I positioned the point in it's final location and found the nearest structure (scenery, building, platform, lineside hut etc) that could hide the operating position of the Seep point motor. This position must be at right angles to the point connection. If there was no available structure, I added one!
Next, using a dremel, or a router or other power tool (you could use a hand tool), I cut a channel 2mm wide by 2mm deep from the point actuator to the structure position. I drilled an 8mm hole straight through the baseboard and installed the Seep motor under the board so that the actuator arm was in the center of the hole in it's center position. The advantage of the Seep motor is that it has two screw holes in it's base so it can be screwed onto the bottom of the board. I glued mine on with Araldite.
Now measure and cut the tube such that it begins at the edge of the drilled hole, and ends at the outer position of the point travel. If you are using Peco points, then they are self latching and don't need any other springs etc
Take the rod and bend the last 5mm at 90 degrees, slide the bent section under and into the actuating hole in the point, slide the tube over the rod and drop it into the channel you have cut. Offer it up to the Seep arm and cut it off about 1.5mm short of the arm.
Take a 10mm section of the tube and bevel a 'V' notch in the middle to allow the tube to be bent at 90 degrees. Side the rod into one end, and drop the other end over the Seep arm. Next, using Araldite, carefully cement the tube into the channel making sure to leave at least 5mm at each end clear to avoid gumming up the works. Put a tiny drop of Cyanoacrylate on the rod/tube assembly at the Seep end to secure the joint. Leave it to dry then test the motor operation. If all is well, you can fill the cahnell in to hide it, then place your structure over the hole where the Seep has been fitted, no unsightly holes, no marks on the board, no fuss!
You can then operate the motor using a mimic board, or switches. The Seeps come with a built in switch (there are different model numbers with different options), so there's no need to add a switch.
Hope this helps, I will re-post if I manage to take some photos of another installation.
Marshon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.