newbie

I'll start by saying how glad I was to find your newsgroup and the site that
goes with it. Here's my situation:
when I was about 12 I had an intercity 125 set and a few other locos - it
got stored at my mum'. Now I'm nearly 40 and have kids of my own I decided
to resurrect it. I was disappointed to find my brother had swiped my deltic,
warship and shunter for his kids but at least the original set was left.
However, the tracks just don't seem to conduct properly. I've tried sanding
the tops and a few new fishplates but it still isn't right.
A friend has suggested I'd be better off buying new track. So my questions:
Could I get away with cleaning and more new fishplates - if so can I get
them anywhere cheaper than£1.20 for a bag of 12?
Where is the cheapest place to buy new track?
Any advice greatly appreciated.
Reply to
the man with no idea
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Are you sure its the track and not the locos needing a clean / lube after a long storage. Have you tried putting a meter to the track to check voltage? Rob
Reply to
Rob
Thanks for the reply Rob. Short answer is no. Have you got any tips for cleaning/lubing/refurbing an old engine.
Ant
Reply to
the man with no idea
If you're having problems with track - particularly the track-on-the-carpet approach, then you should check that the power clip (if you're using one) is a good fit (the connectors are in firm contact with the rail) The movement of the train can be enough to dislodge it, then the train stops suddenly.
you can buy a track cleaning rubber from peco (PL-41), which you can use to clean the train wheels if you square off one of the edges with a craft knife. An electrolube pen ( Peco - PL 64) can help cure electrical pick-up problems (do not apply this to parts of the wheels that ar in contact with the track!)
Which locos are you looking to refurbish?
The Hornby HST's fairly robust, ocasionally the power clip that connects to the front bogie bogie come off and the wheels get dirty.....thats been about it with my 2. Spares-wise, pretty much everything's available for it; light lenses bogies, cab glazing etc...
Craig
Reply to
Craig Douglas
I would like to make a start in railway modelling. I have a keen interest in computer control (I'm a retired technology teacher and have good knowledge of basic computer control in models/robots). I would like to go down the line of DCC in time and also Live stream. Where do I start? which manufacture should I go with Hornby/Peco/Bachmann/etc also which layouts should I consider/not consider so that I do not make an expensive mistake. Should I buy track etc from Ebay/carboot sales or New. Are there any good web sites that I should also browse? I'm sure this will be the first of main postings so I apologize if this posting has come up before. I live in Mid Wales are there any railway modellers out there from my neck of the woods.
Many thanks
Howard Morgan
Reply to
howard.m
You have? _Interesting_..
Where in mid-? If near the coast, reccommend talking to the Aeron Valley Railway Society - meets 2nd wednesday of the month in the Prince of Wales in Aberaeron. There's a related club in Tregaron, too.
And there's me, but it's a while since anything happened on the boards currently overhanging this machine..
Reply to
ANDREW ROBERT BREEN
In my opinion, I would use Peco track and turnouts, Hornby Locos (the later ones made in China) Bachman coaches and goods wagons. Avoid Lima, old Hornby and Split Chassis Bachman Locos if you are going DCC. Many of the new Locos are being produced DCC ready(plug installed) others you will need to hardwire which can be easy in Diesels and often more of a challenge in Steam Live steam uses its own propairity controls, which means you can not mix it with a DC or DCC layout unless you have separate wiring. Also one controller will run all the Live steam locos at once unless you wire separate section insolated from each other. I guess you could have one "loop:" of track dedicated to live steam though. Hope this helps Rob
Reply to
Rob
You are not alone in modelling in Mid Wales, however this is a large area. Give us a hint
Reply to
Keith J Patrick
Proprietry manufacturers seem to only offer two possibilities; analogue control or DCC. It is quite practical to drive your railway from a computer using a simple home made interface and program, or with DCC through a ready made (and expensive) DCC interface and proprietry programing which I find very limiting.
Peco is excellent for trackwork. Hornby and Bachmann track could well be a mistake. As far as models go, buy one of each, or one of everything. All the British outline models now come from one or two Chinese factories and the quality is adequate.
New only. IMHO.
Regards, Greg.P. NZ.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
From the original poster's mention of Hornby/Peco/Bachmann it appears that he is considering ready-to-run 00 gauge Live Steam from Hornby. New Mallard sets are available from £350 although list price is £499.
Dave W.
Reply to
David Westerman
I would like to go
If you are going into live steam seriously you need a good pension or a lathe, preferably both. A decent second hand Myford will cost £500, or a new far-eastern about the same. Before you buy anything you must visit lots of different types and scales of railway. Contact Gauge 0 Guild, Guage 1 Assoc., and the 16mm assoc. Suggest your eyesight is too old for 4mm steam :)
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Parkes
Firstly, don't buy second-hand track. You will almost certainly regret it especially if it has been nailed down at some point. Also, you will be hard pushed to find anything but old steel track second hand which is nowhere near as good as the nickel-silver track which is now standard. As others have posted, Peco are probably the best bet, having by far the biggest range of trackwork at various levels of fineness.
As for locos, you may find that the types you actually want are only available from one manufacturer - there is little duplication of prototypes between the brands. Here's a summary of the brands from *my perspective*. Others may disagree....
Hornby Recent releases have been streets ahead of anything produced 2 or more years ago. For post-steam modellers like me, that meens the class 50. For steam fans, there is more to choose from of the more recent releases. Many of the older steam models are tender-drive which seems to be universally hated!
Bachmann Bachmann produce some of the best ready-to-run rolling stock. Carriages and wagons are streets ahead of the Hornby stuff in the main. As for locomotives, all the current Bachmann range of diesels and electrics have central can motors and flywheels and reliable smooth runners. Some of the range has been critisised for lack of accuracy, but for the less demanding like me, they are more than acceptable and good value. I'm less familliar with the Bachmann steam range, but I understand that many of them are excellent.
Lima Lima went out of business a couple of years ago after a long period of knocking-out poor running locos with basic levels of details and accuracy. Hornby have just bought the remains of the company, but it is unclear whether the name or any of the old range will resurface in the UK.
Heljan A relatively recent entrant into the market - has produced some of the best diesel models to date.
The rest..... Dapol produce a range of wagons and the odd locomotive, but the general concensus is that they are not great. I have a couple of Dapol wagons which are OK. If you can't find what you want from the mainstreem manufacturers, there may be a kit out there. These range in quality and price and construction methods (brass, white-metal, plastic, resin)
If you are starting from scratch, I'd go DCC right from the outset. Changing later will be much more difficult. The market leader of DCC in the UK seems to be Lenz who also produce DCC systems for Bachmann. ZTC are a UK-based supplier of DCC.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
I live between Newtown and Welshpool
Reply to
howard.m
Well David, Bachman make big stuff and if he's seen a Rocket he would include Hornby, and Peco do everything. I don't consider a Mallard at £350 something to be bought on a state pension, or indeed any sort of involvement in live steam, hence the first para and encouragement to broaden his horizon in the second. Good 00 gauge steam is £1000 plus, no different from 16mm.
Ken.
Reply to
Ken Parkes
It's just as easy to build your own DCC system and write the software to drive it. There are numerous DIY designs on the web.
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew
I've found a few loco control DCC designs, but no accessory control designs. (decoders)
The possible advantage would be in the amount of wiring required under the layout, but the cost of proprietary offerings has kept me away.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
The MERG accessory decoder design (and a neat encoder) is freely available on the MERG DCC page
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There are various flavours for driving twin-coil or tortoise style point motors and also for driving LEDs. MERG members can purchase complete kits.
Andrew
Reply to
MBQ
(decoders)
Hi Andrew, unfortunately, MERG requires one to pay a subscription for access, which is just a bit tricky from outside the UK. Bank drafts cost more to obtain than the subscription itself and apparently incur similar costs at the other end.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
Had the same problem. Now model in N gauge but the family wanted to see my original HO locos. This was 20 years after they were put in storage.
Simply put the track was a writeoff. Cheaper to invest in new stuff than try and clean the old pieces. I gave up after sandpaper and steel wool failed to budge the muck on the rails. (I was not responsible for the storage of the track at the time just the locos - you live and learn I guess).
Locos were clean, straight and dust free.
Stripped them down and used Peco lube on all the internal moving parts and gears - not wheels. Gently worked the gears manually to make sure they had not seized. Used the Peco wheel cleaner on the wheels. I find this tool simple but effective. Took about 30 minutes in total. The engines ran first go when applied to clean track.
Then wrapped them up and put them away again after the kids watched them go.
Maybe in 20 years the grandchildren may want to see them.
Andrew
track-on-the-carpet
Reply to
Andrew Robson
Thanks for the tips.
So where do I get the Peco lube and wheel cleaner and where's the cheapest place to buy new track? Any ideas?
Reply to
the man with no idea

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