Any recomended books on welding?


For a complete beginer?.
Thanks
Reply to
Bike Nut
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I found that welders handbook was and is still useful. You can find it at Sears, Home Depot and most book stores like Hastings. There are most likely more but we do not have the other stores in our town.. Don D.
Reply to
Don D.
A good text for a beginner is: "The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding" by Lincoln Electric
It covers many of the welding processes, design, quality control, etc.
You might try a community college bookstore or a used book store.
For example, I picked up an old copy of "Arc-Welding Manual" by GE dated October, 1928 for five dollars that has actual "lessons" on striking an arc on up, bead placement, angles, etc.
Reply to
Serial # 19781010
It might sound archaic, but hit up your local library!
-Tom
Reply to
TT
Welder's Handbook, by Richard Finch. Thirteen bucks at Amazon -
Bob S.
Reply to
Robert Scibienski
Welding Skills, third edition Bert Newfoundland
Reply to
Bert Plank
I recommend that Ernie Leimkuhler writes one. I would buy two just so that I can keep one in the safe.
Regards,
Boris Mohar
Got Knock? - see: Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs
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Reply to
Boris Mohar
The only way I could afford to write one is to presell it to have something to live on while writing it.
That might work....have to think about it.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
While Haynes manuals,as A rule, suck they do have A pretty good basic welding manual in there Techbook line. Also HPBooks Welders Handbook is A good basic textbook . They cost too much but if you split the cost of them with another student there not too bad. Good luck! God yule H.R.
Reply to
harleyron
Put me down for 2.
3 if you can keep the price under $50 per.
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
Warning, warning, warning! Usefulness and value of the contents notwithstanding, less than one percent of the folks who say they'll buy something like this actually do. Not trying to insult anyone or their intentions, but from my own personal experience on smaller projects, getting help or commitments is harder than it sounds. On the other hand, I myself would really like a book that takes me beyond what I have. Most of what I've found is written for someone who's drawing an arc for the first time but little beyond that, or worse, way beyond that. I don't have time to go to the local college for welding class to bring back what I learned 20 years ago, and even there most of what I would learn would come after years into a welding career, which I don't have. I have books from many years past, as well as a US Navy steelworkers rate manual, which I really like. Too many drawings and black and white pictures and not enough color photos in more detail, though. There's gobs of "tribal knowledge" that never makes it into books. Maybe a book called "What your mother never taught you about welding" or something. I will state, for what its worth, that I would be far more likely to buy such a book than anything else on the market.
| | | > | > I recommend that Ernie Leimkuhler writes one. I would buy two just so that I | > can keep one in the safe. | > | > | > | > Regards, | > | > Boris Mohar | > | > Got Knock? - see: | > Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs
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| | | The only way I could afford to write one is to presell it to have | something to live on while writing it. | | That might work....have to think about it.
Reply to
carl mciver
I will order a copy to. All of my welding education has been of the self taught variety. Books I have checked out from our county library are of the beginning welding variety with 10 pages on how to put on your protective gear, and then standard butt, tee, edge, and lap welding usually using 1/4" plate. Little information is given for the more advanced stuff like how to weld cast iron, and when not to. Which stainless steels can be welded to which, and what are the problems that may show up. The other end of the book spectrum is the one that has 100 pages including 35 charts and graphs on the welding one particular supper alloy used in jet engine turbine rotors. If you write a book covering that middle ground it would be the only one on the market, and should sell very well.
Reply to
Mike Swift
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
Modern Welding, by Althouse, Turnquist, Bowditch.
I like it because it illustrates the kinds of movements to make when holding a welding rod. It's good for te "theory" side, too. If you haven't seen any one weld, the "hold it like this, make these kinds of movements, and you should get this result" kind of stuff is very usefull.
While I haven't bough it, there's a Monster Garage book I looked through at the book store. I was liked it, but more to see the kinds of stuff people do with welding.
Reply to
Jeff Polaski

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