chain saw welding

I have a cracked crankcase on my husqvarna 371 chainsaw. Looks to be a cast
aluminum of some sort. It isn't under much is any pressure during
operation. Do you gurus think its weldable with a MIG setup (aluminum wire,
pure argon)? Thanks
John
Reply to
Doctor John
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Here I was all set for something truly weird, some combination of forge welding, explosive joining, all done with chainsaws.
Steve
Doctor John wrote:
Reply to
Steve Smith
It's unlikely that MIG will do a good job. Cracks are always full of oil to contaminate the weld plus you have no idea what alloy is in there. Or it could be magnesium.
Doctor John wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
If you need a new one I built an engine from a Suzuki Hyabusa for a "Hot-saw" The thing was built to attach 40" bar, the teeth look like they came from a shark... It's a 1600 CC Turbocharged nitromethane burning engine. The guy never finished it. I saw video's of saw competitions and they are insane.... Back to your question, I have had good luck with that HTS2000 rod with MAPP on cast parts. I could send you a rod if you wind up in a corner. Stuff works miracles. I have yet to be disappointed with it. The Suzuki may be a "little" overkill but I can't sell the thing to save my life and I'm short on space.
Respects,
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
That engine would make an impressive bike, I don't think I want it on *my* chainsaw though..
What's the limit on chainsaws? Does it have to be something the guy can pick up and use without hoist, or what?
I saw some guys years ago with hot saws, they were modified stock saws, very cool.. had some impressive expansion chambers, probably 26" long.
To the OP- call the Husq. dealer, he can likely tell you what alloy you're dealing with. I'd guess it's aluminum, based on the fact mine is pretty heavy considering all the plastic on it.
John
Reply to
JohnM
I have a .Mpg video with a couple of guys with a v8 Chevy saw, no shit. I just E-mailed it to you, it's wild they go from a regular hot saw (well, regular is not even close but.....) This has to be seen to believe.
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
Can you send me the video please? Use bmohar-_AT_-gmail.com
Regards,
Boris Mohar
Got Knock? - see: Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs (among other things)
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Reply to
Boris Mohar
I have a copy of the video, the first two guys have what looks like a Harley twin cylinder, the next two guys have the Chevy V-8. Drops through a 16" log in less than 2 seconds. Of course, the two guys that flip a full chevy V-8 around like it's no big deal are fairly strudy characters.
RDF wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Yeah, I suppose if you were going to cut a load of wood with the thing you'd want to use the aluminum block V-8..
That's pretty nutty stuff, the Stihl they compare it to in the split screen is doing an impressive job, someone dialed that saw well.
John
Reply to
JohnM
John, The only issues you'll have with MIG are as follows: 1.) What you are wanting to weld is probably on the thin side for MIG. I'd recommend you use .023" aluminum wire. I'd also recommend using 4043 wire. If your local weld store doesn't have it, you can order the wire and standard #2 tweco tips at
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2.) You will have to get the saw case VERY clean...which will probably involve taking the saw completely apart. Dirty aluminum doesn't weld well. -Wayne- P.S. Pure Argon is correct.
Reply to
clutchglass
Rob, Is there a web site for this HTS2000 rod you're talking about? I'd very much like to have a look at it. It sounds kinda like an old trick someone showed me years ago to allow you to use aluminum stick rod with OA in a pinch by doing the following:
1.) Start off with clean aluminum and a pure acetelyene flame.
2.) Soot the entire area you want to weld untill it is black with carbon smoke.
3.) Adjust your flame to a neutral flame.
4.) Start preheating the weld area with the neutral flame.
5.) When the soot burns off, your aluminum is at welding temperature...start adding the stick rod and welding (you really have to move out fast!). There won't be any sparking & the base metal won't warn you (by getting red) when it's about to get too hot. It takes some practice & don't ever expect it to look like a TIG bead, but I've been some places in the army where it worked very well in a pinch. -Wayne-
Reply to
clutchglass
"Doctor John" skrev i en meddelelse news:37b4c$4319febc$943fa6f4$ snipped-for-privacy@STARBAND.NET...
You might want to contact the Husqvarna distributor.. They are usually pretty good about spareparts, atleast over here in Scandinavia...
I doubt welding would do it any good, especially if you havent tried welding cast aluminum before..
/peter
Reply to
Q
There is no way in text to describe that- would you agree? I felt *normal* after seeing those maniacs with that thing.
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
Check your E-mail and enjoy,
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
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You might need HTS-528 if it's ferrous. Both work great. I'm hard guy to convince something that "miraculous" but I'm already on my third order of the stuff... It works really good and if you don't have a MAPP torch I have used this filler with my tig will light Argon (5CFM-ish) just not to fry the tungsten... works like a champ.
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
Thanks. That's insane.
Regards,
Boris Mohar
Got Knock? - see: Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs (among other things)
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Reply to
Boris Mohar
Thanks to all for the input - I'll check into this further before trying to weld it. The saw isn't a high value item and I think a new crankcase half would be outpricing it.
John
Reply to
Doctor John
Rob, Can you...or someone send me this infamous V-8 chainsaw video to snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com? Also I have some pretty awesome brazing rod I got from exergon. I'll have a look see & get the info on it for you. That HTS stuff looks interesting...but WOW is it expensive! -Wayne-
Reply to
clutchglass
Are you referring to the saw, the engine, or the muscles?? :)
RDF wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
After thinking about it, all of the above apply...
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF

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