cleaning of slag?

perhaps a silly question: Is there any drawbacks , apart from cosmetics, in
not removing the slag left after fluxcore welding?
Henning (just become the owner of 2 migs)
Reply to
henning wright
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Some of the slag will eventually come off naturally, some due to impact with other objects, some due to temp changes or flexing of the project. If you paint things, this will leave bare spots. Of more concern is that the slag might be hiding some flaws in your weld.
henn> perhaps a silly question: Is there any drawbacks , apart from cosmetics, in
Reply to
RoyJ
I guess no drawbacks. But why would you want to leave something half done?
Do it once. Do it right.
You want it to say, "The man who did this is a pro."
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
the flux will absorb moisture and then accelerate rusting.corrosion. If you paint over the flux it wil cover then months later when the flux falls off it will take tehpain with it. Now you have a perfect place for moisture to reach under your paint. Once thepaint film is broken you have a mess. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
Hey Randy,
But what he wants to know is, IS THERE A DOWN SIDE? Har har..
Just saw this on the news. I didn't know you were really SERIOUS about joining Texas!
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Yur fella "neo-con".
Randy Zimmerman wrote:
Reply to
Vernon
As an additional note: Often with fine tuning the heat adjustment one can have the slag almost fall off. I have not used enough self shielding flux core to say for certain but for gas shielded flux core as well as stick electrodes it makes a difference. Normally you should not have to chip and hammer away. A well run bead often only needs the point of the chipping hammer dragged across the weld bead surface. Re joining: There are lots of us that would join the Union in a heartbeat!!!! I guess though we would have to put up with Texas :'))) We are not happy with the corruption back East. Is this treason ??? Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
I think one of the prettiest things is when you do a perfect pass with 7018, and the slag starts to peel up before you get to the end of the stick. You raise your hood, and the slag continues to rise up like a curling potato peeling.
Sometimes you don't even have to hit it with a wire brush.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Well, if you don't remove the slag on the cover pass and the weld is being inspected, the inspector is going to ask that it be removed. Might as well do it right the first time.
You are removing the slag between passes aren't you?
Reply to
footy
footy wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com:
Yes on multipass, I am very careful to get all slag of. The point about rust promotion seems good enough to me. It´s not that much work anyway, I can get almost all of with just a wirebrush. Thanks for the input Henning (not so lazy anymore)
Reply to
henning wright
Hi everyone
Making slag "self-peeling" is something which welding consumable manufacturers try to do if it is possible. It's not enetirely accidental. The scientists working for these companies know what gives the slag self-peeling tendency. Unless any higher priority makes you have to use a formulation which cannot be self-peeling, they will make it do so. The thermal expansion / contraction coefficient would be the thing to work on, I think - make it as different as possible from that of steel so that the slag layer breaks free on cooling.
"self-peeling" will get noticed and folk will want to buy more of your product.
RS.
Reply to
richard.smith.met
As a last note it is interesting how some employers will tell a new welder, " Don't waste time cleaning your welds. We have labourers to do that." Other outifts will tell the welder to clean all welds and remove all spatter. Cleaning your welds forces you to visually inspect the results. It is a convenient time to repair rather than discover the fault just before paint. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
Hey, 6013 does the same!!!
SteveB wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Amen. When I did this for a living I was low on the totem pole, did the cleanup and repair. One fellow left me with a nice looking vertical seam weld. After chipping the slag, it was quite apparent that he had a nice bead on both sides, not a speck of weld joining the two plates. It's not nice to tattle on your fellow workers but sheesh, get him out of there!
Place was a little short on equipment so someone was always carping about my habbit of grabbing the needed tools: 1 stinger line, 1 O/A line, two air lines, and 2 grinders all heading off to some weldment.
Randy Zimmerman wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Where I work the big tools are all painted, except for the welds which are clear coated. Saves a lot of hassle when it's time to inspect the tool after load testing. You can't hide anything from hundred of peering eyes!
| As a last note it is interesting how some employers will tell a new welder, | " Don't waste time cleaning your welds. We have labourers to do that." | Other outifts will tell the welder to clean all welds and remove all | spatter. | Cleaning your welds forces you to visually inspect the results. It is a | convenient time to repair rather than discover the fault just before paint. | Randy |
| > footy wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com: | > | >> Well, if you don't remove the slag on the cover pass and the weld is | >> being inspected, the inspector is going to ask that it be removed. | >> Might as well do it right the first time. | >> | >> You are removing the slag between passes aren't you? | >> | > | > Yes on multipass, I am very careful to get all slag of. The point about | > rust promotion seems good enough to me. It´s not that much work anyway, I | > can get almost all of with just a wirebrush. | > Thanks for the input | > Henning (not so lazy anymore) | |
Reply to
carl mciver

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