Dynasty 200 question

Simple question. When the argon tank is open but the welder is off or on
but not welding, there appears to be a slow flow of argon. There does not
appear to be any leaks on the external connections. Is this normal. Is a
small amount intentionally bled off internally in the machine. If it is not
normal, any suggestions where I should look for the problem?
Thanks
Barry
Reply to
BP
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I think that it is common for the gauges to leak a small amount. I noticed that my Dynasty gauges went to zero if I left them pressurized with the tank valve closed tightly. I double checked all the fittings and could not find any leaks. Just remember to close the tank valve when done. Sometimes I remember to bleed them off before shutting the machine down and sometimes I don't. They are always back to zero the next day.
Reply to
bitternut
Same here...annoying leak that I cant find. Thought maybe it was internal to the machine, but I havent checked any further. If you find something, please let us know. Chuck
bitternut wrote:
Reply to
Chuck Willis
At least I'm not the only one.
Thanks
Barry
Reply to
BP
Happens to me too figured it was dried out seals on an old MIG machine. Recently got a new machine, does the same damn thing. None of the ecternal connections is leaking, don;t know about the gauges themselves though.
Probably a gas company and gauge/welder company conspiracy! :)
Larry
Reply to
Larry
Following on from all in this thread about "slow Argon leak".
I was trying to find out where the leak was, regarding Argon to my TIG machine.
Went to pneumatics place and was saying wanted these fittings to pressurise my hoses and look for leaks. Guy disappeared off for a couple of minutes and came back, told me this: "Argon will find leaks in hoses which are sealed to compressed air."
Helium is terrible for finding leaks to get out of. Argon is apparently not far behind. Guess the principle is - Argon and Helium are inert gases. Gases like hydrogen form H2 molecules, oxygen forms O2 mol's, etc. Certainly Helium does not form molecules. Guess Argon's the same. Those little single atoms are going to find smaller "leak paths" than a diatomic molecule which needs a bigger path to see it as a "leak".
Was told - this is why there are these all-encasing brass crimp-fittings for Argon lines. The tube is something slightly, but not hugely, special, as well.
Turn the Argon off when you are not using the welder and the leakage you get is minimal compared to the legitimate consumption.
Richard Smith
Reply to
Richard Smith

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