Railroad Track Anvil

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I'm in sort of a unique situation. I work at a military training site for urban warfare which consists of a small third world city. The city has a small rail area with a street crossing which is mainly used to deny access by blocking the street with a rail car. When the contractors built the rail lines, they left the spare ties and a few feet of rail.
Shawn
Reply to
Shawn
I saw a base that was made of concrete and poured round. About 30" round, and 6" thick. Once you got it up on its balance point, it would roll around pretty good. It had a piece of 2" flatbar around the bottom so the concrete wouldn't chip off as it rolled.
Bulletproof.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I want one too. I have seen railroad track anvils, and they are decent for the hobbyist. For what I would want to use it for, anyway.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Rail offcuts from repairs, are often left along the tracks. Many rail roads have rules that if rail is scrapped, it must be chopped into short chunks (2' - 3' long), and these chunks end up at scrap yards.
The best stuff is heavy crane rail. It can be 12 - 18 inches tall and is much heavier than normal rail track. Makes much bigger anvils.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
For my intended purposes, a railroad track anvil will do just fine as well. Where the track is not enough, for now, my forklift's counterweight is an ideal anvil with many different curves, steps and flat areas.
Shawn
Reply to
Shawn
Getting a band rolled at a shop probably wouldn't be that much. Or you could just get lucky and find a piece of large diameter pipe and cut a slice. Easy to say, harder to do, unless you have a cutting band ............
You might be able to get a piece of sonotube to form the round part, or just get a piece of sheet metal cut and make it into a round tube, and cut it off when the concrete hardens. Or leave it on.
Now that you got the idea, you might reach some creative solutions on your own.
Might even be able to get a rolled piece of rebar from a local supplier or steel yard. They use them all the time in big pours. It would be very durable for a rolling ring, and you could weld other rebar to it inside the pour for strength.
Then you might consider buying a forklift to move this growing puppy .....................
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
"Al Patrick" wrote some "stuff.." Where to begin! Oh, Al, now that I know what you have to tell us, I can see that I should go out and destroy my rail anvil, as well as all my welding stuff along with it. Impossible to know when some sneaky foreigner will take these things and use them against our beloved country. But, don't you see--it's not only welding track--it's EVERY form of craftsmanship. Can't be careful enough.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Does this mean that I now have to destroy my old rim hose holders?
sigh .................... snort ....................... whine .....................
Please! Anything but that!
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Damn...this probably means that we need to start recycling concoms too...just to eliminate clandestine cloning....
Tim
Reply to
The Guy
Hey, it' up to you, but if you don't melt down all of that terrorist-inducing stuff you won't be able to get a thick-enough blast door for your bunker.
Your loss.
Reply to
Rich Jones
One 500+ year-old * preacher, seven relatives, and a boatload of animals. That explains a few things.
Wayne
*
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(remember - if it's good enough to be on the Internet, then it must be true)
Reply to
wmbjk
"The Guy" wrote: Damn...this probably means that we need to start recycling concoms too...(clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ STOP this at once! You are just putting new ideas in the minds of the terrorists. If you are truly patriotic, and wish to support the war on terror, you will stop thinking of things.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Leo Lichtman wrote in article ...
I suspect that the people involved in terrorist activities have already thought up some pretty scary things on their own - far beyond a little joking around on an internet news group, and far beyond the thinking of the vast majority of the world's population.
After all, who ever suggested using a modern airliner as a warhead?
Reply to
Bob Paulin
Bob Paulin wrote in article ...
Terrorists are capable of thinking up activities that would make a strong person pale.
For example, nobody had to write on a news group that beheading someone is far more graphic and disturbing than shooting them. They already knew that, and that's why they do it!
I also suspect that the continuous "Chicken Little" warnings from people such as Al Patrick and you serve to de-sensitize people on the real issues - to the point that they begin to take serious discussion on these issues with a large grain of rock salt, expecting the "knee-jerkers" to control the discussions.
Given Al Patrick's paranoia and convoluted thinking resulting from an innocent question about welding, I would certainly not believe him if he were reporting live, from a 747 airliner headed straight down to the 50-yard-line at the Super Bowl - with three television cameras mounted in the cockpit, cabin, and on the wing broadcasting on all television stations - broadcast and cable - in real time....well, maybe if the cameras were REALLY in focus. LOL!
Such preposterous notions as those of Al Patrick - and yourself - are really, to quote comedian Gallagher, "...THAT, F****ing Stupid!"
If we allow the terrorists to change the way we live, and the way we think - suspecting everbody and everything, and afraid to pass along technical information to help a fellow hobbyist or trade worker because it might be used incorrectly - then they will have won.
Reply to
Bob Paulin
Leo Lichtman wrote in article ...
Given your twisted rationale, perhaps the nation's security people should stop developing extra security for major public events.....it only gives terrorists new ideas for targets that we consider to have high value, doesn't it?
Reply to
Bob Paulin

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