Some help please

hey guy i'm about to blow 850 canadian on a MIG certification and
course.
i wanna check its the right thing to do.
1_ will i be able to get work with this certification n(TSSA) , as i
have no work experience.
2_ in my spare time i want t help some friends out who need stage
repairs to be done, and want me to help them build outdoor 'sculptures'
for want of a better word that will be quite large.
is mig what i need ?? well if you guys could help me out that would
be great.
cheers guys
Reply to
solo
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I am guessing you are back East. I am out West. It is almost a different country. I keep my hopes up :')) I would test to CWB or ASME. I am wondering why you would test to any other certifying authority. Maybe to AWS if you intended to work below the 49th??? Outdoor sculptures when they get dangerously large in a public place would need an engineer's approval. He would require that welding be done to a structural code such as AWS or CWB. If you test to TSSA you might find companies that will not recognise your qualifications. If you have no work experience I am wondering why you would go this route and why the course does not certify to CWB???? Are the instructors unable to qualify as certified welding inspectors under the CWB requirements? I would ask a few more questions before plunking down my hard earned dollars. Randy
hey guy i'm about to blow 850 canadian on a MIG certification and course.
i wanna check its the right thing to do.
1_ will i be able to get work with this certification n(TSSA) , as i have no work experience. 2_ in my spare time i want t help some friends out who need stage repairs to be done, and want me to help them build outdoor 'sculptures' for want of a better word that will be quite large.
is mig what i need ?? well if you guys could help me out that would be great.
cheers guys
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
OK thanks mr.
i'll check out. It seems that when i mentioned to the college that i would be using the 'skills' to help friends out with their stages and sculptures .. this is what he suggested.
maybe its because i didnt make it clear that i also intended to look for some kind of paid work using the cert.
you could have just saved me a lot of money.
..am i glad i found this forum.
Just to pick your brain. If you were starting out wanting to learn to weld inorder to work what would you do? MIG cert or Tig .. or do all of them and then brave the world of work :-) Thankyou
R. Zimmerman wrote:
Reply to
solo
I don't think you have an idea about what work is like in the world of welding. Working as a welder requires one to operate a variety of machinery as well as weld using a variety of processes. Rarely is the work clean, quiet, or climate controlled. I would suggest working in a welding/fabrication shop as a labourer to get some insight about where you would like to go in this endeavour. You will get some work experience and lots of ideas from your workmates. Each geographic area has different market demands for certain skills. Knowing what skills and abilities you need to acquire for certain jobs in your area is important. Many people work on pressure pipe tickets an then realise they don't want to be working on steam plant shutdowns out of town all their life. Others become disenchanted working inside on production welding never seeing outside until the end of the working day. If you can get a basic MIG qualification that would be good for starters. Most TIG qualifications infer that you are capable of pressure pipe work and have a working knowledge of alloys, pipe fitting, pressure vessel code requirements and have some previous welding tickets. Do a job search on the internet for work in your geographic area, Make up a handful of one page resumes and start dropping them off at places around where you live. I have dropped resumes off and been phoned over a year later when they finally were looking for someone with my qualifications. The best advice I ever got was from a guy when over half the shop got laid off without warning over Christmas. It was when Trudeau started a feud with Alberta and taxed the oil industry to death. " I was looking for work when I came here and I'll be looking for work when I leave." It's good advice on how to mentally prepare yourself. Never consider any welding job permanent. Randy
OK thanks mr.
i'll check out. It seems that when i mentioned to the college that i would be using the 'skills' to help friends out with their stages and sculptures .. this is what he suggested.
maybe its because i didnt make it clear that i also intended to look for some kind of paid work using the cert.
you could have just saved me a lot of money.
..am i glad i found this forum.
Just to pick your brain. If you were starting out wanting to learn to weld inorder to work what would you do? MIG cert or Tig .. or do all of them and then brave the world of work :-) Thankyou
R. Zimmerman wrote:
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
- snip -
Correction: Never consider _any_ job permanent.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Just a question out of curiosity: what does TSSA stand for, and the governing body.
John Noon
Reply to
John Noon
"Technical Standards and Safety Authority" When I did a Google search. Out West we have things like the Mechanical Contractors Association or the Forestry Industrial Relations. For some reason there are people that just cannot join a national organization and adopt their standards. Too expensive? Loss of Ego?? Not social joiners??? Randy
Just a question out of curiosity: what does TSSA stand for, and the governing body.
John Noon
Reply to
R. Zimmerman

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