TIG versus MIG

Newbie here, this question has surely been asked before. Any pointer to a FAQ or some good link?
Pro and con, which works best for which job type.
Thanks
Mauro
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Can you be more specific? You're asking a huge open ended question
IMHO
Richard

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From the point of view of a model hobbyist joining small parts, possibly thick 1/2" not long 4" max.
Which is easier to learn. Is there some type of material or some type of weld that one system is not suited but the other can do? How about occupied space, is there a difference? My space is limited. Cost of operating and needed accessories.
I was considering an oxy acetylene system but is expensive bulky and safety is a concern, may be a MIG or a TIG system can work for me, is not that I have a specific requirement, being an hobby you adjust your projects and designs to the tools you have.
Appreciate any input to get me started Mauro
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TIG can weld pretty much anything that can be welded. Given your scale of operations, MIG offers little advantage based on it's biggest feature, speed of laying down metal. TIG is somewhat more difficult to learn (requires more complex physical skills, using both hands).
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TIG is the premium welding method, almost all metals, expensive equipment, high skill level. Very slow welding process, about 1/10th the speed of MIG
MIG is the production method of choice, medium priced equipment, lowest skill level requiement. Best on steel, aluminum can be done but it is fussy to get it right.
Stick welding is the most flexible, most portable, cheapest equipment, mid range in skill (more than MIG, less than TIG)
O-A is somwhat obsolete, good for cutting, good for brazing, some small part welding. For smlla parts, the small flame is less of a fire hazard than the flying sparks from MIG or stick.
Your example of thick but small parts is a pain. Thick means high heat (expensive equipment, big power input), small means controlling the heat without melting the part along with distortion are the big issues. If you do trailers and trailer hitches, get a stick. If you do body work and general repair get a MIG (not flux core). If you just do repair and are cheap get a flux core wire feed. If you are doing small intricate parts in steel, stainless steel, and aluminum and are willing to spend the time to get good at it, get a TIG
MG wrote:

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I want to add one comment to Roy's post, which may be trivial and obvious to Roy, but I hope that the OP does not miss it in case if he is not aware.
A TIG welder can be used for stick welding. So if you get a TIG, you can use it for both stick as well as TIG.
There are also separate wire feed units that let one use wire feed gas shielded or fluxcore welding with a constant current supply like TIG.
TIG is unbeatable for work with small parts and "intricate" work.
i

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'Tis true that a TIG can be used for stick welding. But the average newbie will be hard pressed to justify the price and time commitment involved in going straight to TIG. The usual decison is stick vs flux core vs 120 volt MIG vs 240 volt MIG.
Ignoramus24284 wrote:

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Thanks for clarifying many aspect. From what I hear, the best and most flexible for my type of work (play actually) is TIG. This need to be evaluated in light of the steep learning and the higher cost, but now I got something to place in perspective some further reading I need to do.
I will be back with more intelligent question, thanks you all for now.
Mauro
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The "learning how to TIG" is not that steep, if you can live with less than perfect looking welds and without ising your welds for critical applications (like welding objects on which human life depends).
With mild steel, and TIG, if you get a puddle, it will join the joint.
TIG is sometimes used for extremely demanding or critical applications like bicycle welding or aerospace, and learning to get to that level obviously is difficult. But learning how to join pieces of steel for non critical applications is not that hard.
I am also a novice to TIG, so take what I say with a grain of salt.
i

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All good points and useful for me to know that learning can be gradual and is not an all or nothing deal. I am not planning to weld anything life critical for sure.
Mauro
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Definitely not an all of nothing deal. You can weld brackets or supports for not too heavy things, hose hangers, as a first project, or some such.
i

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The only similarity between MIG and TIG is the name, basically.
If you want to go the TIG route, Ernie L. gives a really good exercise involving a washer and a pencil. Look up on google newsgroup archive - you will find a lot of other good stuff. The first time I needed to left-hand TIG, I did it about as well as right-hand TIG because I had practiced the "pencil and washer" - didn't crash the tungsten on that my very first try.
In general though, TIG will reduce a grown person to tears at least once.
TIG is obsolutely clean - if you see sparks, get red dust around your weld and see something like cinders in place of your weld, you are way overheating. Every (?) learner has been there.
I've reminisced about learning TIG in my own way on http://www.weldsmith.co.uk/tech/welding/learn_proc/TIG_ss/crc03/tig_crc03.html
Richard S.
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