Torch Care

Hi Greg,
It's a big relief to me to see that you've done your homework on safety. When I saw where you said you'd nicked the steel with your fingernail I really panicked...
Here's my only additional suggestion for now: If you're using rebar for armatures for artwork I suggest you at least consider getting some mild steel round stock. It is surprisingly cheap even though steel is high. It is easy to heat and bend. If you weld it you can reliably get it to stick together without potential problems.
Metinks it would be a pity for you to spend a lot of time on a successful sculpture only to have it break apart at the welds. In construction work, while welding sections of rebar is not unheard of, it is discouraged. And where it is welded the codes call for a healthy overlap, backup pieces, pre and post heat, as I understand it. I don't mean to imply that I've read any of the codes.
But check on the availability of mild steel rounds. You'll get much more reliable welds.
V C> Vernon,
Reply to
Vernon
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Thanks Vernon. I will give that a try. I am out of rebar so it would be a good time to switch. I was responding to a thread "Welding Instruction - in Tucson AZ"- "Justin E - Nov 29, 3:00 pm" on getting some eduction on welding that wasn't so compreshive and difficult for a working person. He is in Tucson and I am in phone. Grant pretty well convinced us to seek out education at the community colleges in the area and I have decided to take some time off work and go talk to the instructors there. We shall see where it leads.
Thanks for your help and I will let you know how the steel bars work.
Greg
Reply to
ConcreteArtist
I forgot to add that certified mild steel rebar does exist. But it's hard to find. And as rebar goes it's expensive. However, I don't know how the price compares to mild steel rounds.
VT
Reply to
Vernon
Sometimes you can get pump "sucker rod" pretty cheap. Welds ok.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
As long as you use low hydrogen rod. Well actually even then it can be questionable. Sucker rod is definitely not mild steel.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
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Reply to
Wayne Cook
What is sucker rod exactly? I've never heard the term before.
If you use mild steel rod as a filler metal what diameter works best for light to medium welding? Say you are welding two 1/2" rods to a steel plate.
Should you leave a space between the plate and the rod when starting your weld or should you clamp the rod to the plate?
Thanks
Greg
Reply to
ConcreteArtist
It's what pump jacks use to run down the hole and work the pump (which is at the bottom of the hole). It's the steel equivalent of the wood or fiberglass sucker rods used on windmills.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
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Reply to
Wayne Cook
Indeed..but its not going to be used for life safety or loaded work. Stainless steel electrode/wire might work pretty well too. Ill check it out with some rod Ive got kicking around.
Ive used it for lots of stuff around here, besides grape stakes And where else are you going to get 30' joints of rod?
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Greg,
Sucker rod, as already explained, is material used on oilwells. The pieces I have are about 5/8" diameter. And as Wayne Cook states, it is definitely not "mild" steel. But it is made to a STANDARD. Therefore, once you have a welding procedure that works the first time, the chances are, it'll work the next time.
But I reiterate: If you're making armatures for concrete sculptures, plunk down the money and buy some new, mild steel. Sucker rod is great stuff. But if you'll recall my original admonition, always use the minimum carbon content that is required for the job. Carbon is indispensable for making quality tools. Sometimes it is called for in applications such as aircraft or race car frames.
But for the general run of welded structures, mild steel is what you want. And as stated previously, mild steel rounds are relatively cheap. They're easy as pie to heat and bend at will. Easy to weld. Easy to braze. Use carbon steel only when nothing else will do.
V
Reply to
Vernon
Stainless rod should work well for it. I've used lots of it myself. In fact just a few weeks back I rewelded and repaired my dads working pens which I built about 12-14 years ago. Lots of a the original 7018 welds had let go over the years from too many cows trying to break free.
Yep. I've got a fair amount out on one of the steel racks. I use it where appropriate. :-)
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
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Reply to
Wayne Cook

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