Truck frame rot DAMN!!!

So I have been converting my '85 Toyota 1-ton pickup into a flatbed.
The flatbed has been on the truck for a few weeks.
I just have to finish the deck and it is ready to go.
Today I was poking around the frame right above the rear axle.
The original overload bumpers had lost their rubber and in trying to
remove the remaining steel plates the bolts on both sides of the truck
just snapped off.
Now I know why.
I was chipping off some rust that had been above the plate and my
chipping hammer went right through the side of the frame rail.
Kind of like lead foil over graham crackers.
It obviously rusted from the inside out.
It seems I have good steel on either side of this point.
I think there are some internal pieces that were causing the water to
pool inside the rail, at teh same location on both sides of the frame.
So now I have to take everything apart and grind away on the rails to
find the extent of good steel and start adding some steel bandaids.
I am worried about removing the flatbed now because it is holding the
front and back frame sections in alignment.
Oh lots of fun.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
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I was in at the local Hino dealer yesterday, getting an annual inspection ticket for my trailer. They had those little cab/frame trucks there, all shiny white cabs and glossy black frames, economical little diesels, good for a million miles...Man, I hate fixing rusty frames! But I ain't getting one of those in a hurry, so I really sympathise...
Brian
Reply to
Brian
"Ernie Leimkuhler" skrev i en meddelelse news:220320050003449390% snipped-for-privacy@stagesmith.com...
I dont know what they do to prevent icy roads in the US, but over here in Denmark they use buttloads of salt.. I guess you know what that does to cars :-)..
The solution seems to be underbody protection (
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are pretty popular over here )..
Cavities are sprayed this this stuff too ( drill a hole in the door, spray the stuff inside and put a plug in the hole )
This might be worth looking at, if you dont already use this stuff...
/peter
Reply to
Q
That's a pretty common problem on the late '70's and early '80's Jeeps with the boxed frames. Crud gets in, rusts out from the inside. The only thing I can say is that you problably don't need advice on how to weld it up! But here it is anyway: fish plates of the same thickness as the original metal, extend at least one frame width beyond the bad section both directions, ends tapered to a point, weld at the edges of the frame.
Good luck. (and keep grinding!)
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
This truck started it's life in Indiana, where you have a triple threat of Gravel, Sand and Salt. The gravel roads and road sand strip your undergcoating so the winter salt can eat your car. When I left Indiana all the body rust stopped, but it seems some of that salt got into the frame.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
"Ernie Leimkuhler" skrev i en meddelelse news:220320051104487675% snipped-for-privacy@stagesmith.com...
Sounds likely....
Over here it is recommended to repeat the treatment every 2 years
Another possibility: The stuff used here doesnt harden, so it isnt as sensitive about gravel and sand.. Infact.. the sand sticks to the coating and makes it even more durable
/peter
Reply to
Q
Ernie,
Just a lurker and never posted before, but after your structural repairs you might want to look into
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We have been using it on an 85 foot dish antenna in St. Croix. Seems to work well so far against corrosion, salt spray etc.
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:
Reply to
Paul Rhodes
Here in the US they use truckloads of salt.
John
Reply to
JohnM

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