Which hand control is best?

I am purchasing a hand control for my Invertig torch . Has anyone used one of the new CK rotary add on controls? http://www.ckworldwide.com/f190_1.pdf
Any preferences to linear or rotary?
Thanks Pete
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Why not just get a contact button and use the sequencer built into your machine?
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Does anyone have any comments on which style of control is the best?
wrote:

one
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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

used one

your
Hi Ernie, or anyone else who wants to be helpful
Could you explain the details of this, for us simple folk who are not used to rigging-up these things? I can cope with it being conceptually an "idiot's guide" on how to do this :-)
I realised that using a footpedal is not brilliant when you are welding positionally, leaning inside a structure!
Regards
Richard Smith
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From a past post:
Sequencer Description
Subject: Re: New Maxstar 200 DX ... Setup?
Newsgroups: sci.engr.joining.welding Date: Sat, Nov 30, 2002 10:46 PM

What does a sequencer do? Well pretty much everything except make your coffee.
A sequencer is gods gift to repetitive welding jobs.
Any machine with a built in sequencer will have what is called a 2MT-Hold setting. This allows the sequence to be controlled by 2 button taps.
The first part of the sequence is initiated by the first button tap.
1. Preflow gas - This will purge air from the line and torch before the arc initiates.
2. Arc initiation via high frequency.
3. Initial Amperage - This is the amperage the machine starts at once the arc is initiated.
4. Up Slope - this is the amount of time the machine takes to ramp up from the initial amperage to the working amperage.
5. Working amperage - the amperage needed to weld the material.
or
5. Pulsed weld amperage.
Then a second button tap when the weld bead is complete.
6. Down Slope - the time it takes to get from the working amperage to the final amperage. A longer down slope prevents a pit from forming in the end of the weld bead.
7. Final amperage - what the machine slopes down to before terminating the arc.
8. Post flow gas - This shields the tungsten and weld area as both cool.
So all that with just 2 button taps.
To give you an idea of settings, my machine is currently set up for tack welding together stainless steel picket railings.
1/2 second preflow gas, 2 amps initial amperage, 1 second up slope, 80 amps working amperage, pulser is set to 40% on time, 50% background amperage and 1.2 pulses per second, 3 seconds of downslope to a final amperage of 3 amps and 15 seconds or postflow. I adjust the working amperage a little up or down depending on how the welds are going.
Older machines that don't have a 2MT-Hold setting require you to push and hold the button. Releasing the button starts the second half of the sequence.
The Syncrowave 351 at school doesn't have 2MT-Hold so we just use the foot pedal to trigger the sequence.
The main challenge of using a sequencer is figuring out what amperage you really NEED to weld a bead.
Trial and error can get you there.
Here are some guidelines for minimum amperages.
Start with 1 amp for each thousandth of an Inch of thickness (0.001"). So 1/8" steel or aluminum = 0.125" thick = 125 amps. Simple and easy. Now 2 complications. For inside fillet welds, increase amperage by 30% For outside fillet welds, decrease amperage by 30%
Those numbers are for Steel or Aluminum.
For stainless steel, decrease amperage by 30%. For copper, increase amperage by 100%. For bronze, decrease amperage by 50%.
Use of a pulser will skew this amperage estimate. Usually you have to increase the amperage a bit to compensate.
To hook up a control button for the sequencer you can either just buy a remote contactor control button from CK Worldwide, or make your own. I make my own because CK's is just too big to be comfortable. I use OEM replacement buttons for plasma cutter torches ($20 each). They are armored in black silicon rubber so you don't get a shock from any high freq bleed through. The wires for the switch are run along the TIG torch cables. You can just wrap electrical tape every foot or so. I use a heavy fiber sheath to encase the whole lot. The button is just electrical taped to the torch handle. I have tried making fancy brackets and electrical tape works better.
The wires hook up to the first 2 pins for your remote connector. Usually pins A and B.
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