First Build

Wondering if anyone had any suggestions on a good first plane to build.
I am a novice to the hobby, began earlier this year and since then, my
brother and father have caught the 'bug'. My Brother is learning to fly
but my Father wants to build. He is good with carpentry. He has been
searching for plans or a kit to get started. Any help is appreciated.
Thank you,
Tom
Reply to
TGW
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4*40. Great transition from a trainer or poss. could be used as a trainer with a good instructor. Easy quick build and a stunning flyer. Plus there are a lot easy mods to make it look super sharp like sheet the d-tube and turtle deck, cowl the nose, factory wheel pants, mod the canopy etc...
Reply to
nate
Sig 4 * 40.
TGW wrote:
Reply to
Mike Gordon
Two good beginner planes to build are the Great Planes PT 40 and the Goldberg Eagle. Both look good, build easily, and fly great! Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
Sig LT40 or a Goldberg Eagle. Gord Schindler MAAC6694
Reply to
Gord Schindler
I have a Goldberg Eaglet thats like 20 + years old. The wing got a little damage and I'm looking for plans for this plane to do a propper repair
Anyone have some?
Reply to
-=A=-
For your first build, you want a kit that has instructions that are so thorough that you will learn as you go so that your next kit build will go even easier. You also want an aircraft that will be an easy flyer with which you can learn as quickly as possible. With all that in mind, I strongly urge you to go with one of the two best kits that fit those requirements. Either the Hobby Lobby Telemaster Senior kit or the Sig Kadet Senior kit (build it with ailerons, though). Either one will give the best possible start you can get in the hobby.
MJC
Reply to
MJC
If your father is just learning, have him try Balsa USA's Stick 40 Plus. It goes together easily, flies nicely, is rugged. The only disadvantage is that it's one of the ugliest models out there. My first build was one of these, and I took one of the lines in the construction manual to heart: "When you crash your Stick 40 (notice we said when, not if), don't worry -- you built it, you can fix it!"
Morris
Reply to
Morris Lee
You said you started earlier this year. It seems likely you are already flying on your own. Assuming your trainer is still flying, should be able to let your father and brother learn on it. If you are comfortable with flying the trainer, you may want to progress to something more challenging. However, it's possible that when your father says he wants to build, he means he wants to learn on the plane he builds. If that's the case, you will need to choose a trainer type for him. If he's content on learning with trainer then you could work on something more challenging. So, the first thing you are going to have to do is decide if you are building a trainer type plane or a second plane. It would also be useful to know what engine size you are considering.
Reply to
C G
The trainer is still flying. I suggested that he use my trainer but he seems determined to build. Enigne size, .40
Reply to
TGW
Parents can be so stubborn :-)
You've got several choices.
First is to let him build his trainer. A few people have already given you good suggestions. I've always liked Sig. The problem with the second trainer option is you are now stuck with two trainers.
The next option is for you to convince him that everyone can have more fun if you build a good second plane, which would be a little more challenging to fly. Help him understand that this would help you and your brother progress as pilots while he is getting his wings on the trainer. Maybe he will realize this is a better use of his talents than building another trainer. I suspect you have already tried this approach, and it didn't work.
The third choice is build two planes, one for you and your brother to progress on and one for your father to learn with. Something like the 4*40 would be a good second plane.
Reply to
C G
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The Great Planes PT-40 would be another good choice. The manual that comes with the kit is very thorough at explaining how to accomplish each step. I'm building a Tower Hobbies Uproar 60 now, and have referred back to the trainer manual a few times for the tips on certain things.
I built the PT-60 and it is a good building plane and flies great. One of our club members built a PT-40 and it is also a great flier. If you choose a PT, and will be using ailerons, I recommend building the 'sport' wing that has less dihedral than the 'trainer' wing. My PT-60 ended up with about an inch less dihedral than specified in the plans (I stopped sanding on the wing roots when I got an excellent fit) and it is still very stable.
Carrell
Reply to
Carrell
LOL
You're right. I've always said that "It's not easy raising parents".
Thanks for the help.
Reply to
TGW
The 4 Star is a great plane I agree...Never had one but know many that have.
Before even opening the box I'd have another canopy opened first...The stock canopy looks absolutely like crap.Why they haven't tried something tht looks better is unknown to me. The stock canopy is detested on this end.....Get the measurement of the fuse where the canopy goes and write StansFiberglass.com and he'll make what you want. Did I say,I don't like the canopy???? LOL
Happy flying and have a fun time..... It's a lot of fun when the family gets involved..Really.
Reply to
TX_QBALL
If you ever wanted to learn anything about customizing a 4*40, including the canopy, check out this site.
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guy did an awesome and inspiring job and gives tips on how to do many of the same mods. I used this site as a reference when I built mine and am glad I did because it was worth the effort even for a first time builder.
Reply to
nate

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