Good Electric ARF for Windy Conditions?

I took the glider out for a fly yesterday (along with a new Vulcan
that turned out to have a bad radio, alas, but a wonderful Ebay seller
is actually refunding my purchase price, and I get to keep the plane for
parts), but the Weather Channel was a bit off about conditions. It was
supposed to be a steady 6mph breeze, no gusts, but the actual conditions
even 10' off the ground were more like 10-20mph, and the plane actually
shuddered and flapped visibly when it went cross-wind. I got in two good
flights, then on the third crashed on landing. (Hopefully the plane will
be ok when I tape it back together.) The wind only picked up as I was
getting aloft for the first flight.
ANYWAY, is there such a beast as the subject line suggests? I'm
thinking a stubby plane with lots of power and fairly short wings, but
not so heavy it plummets to the ground in gusts. Three channels would
probably be best, but I'm used to two, and price is an issue, so two
would be ok as well. Any suggestions, aside from "Don't fly when it's
windy!"? The problem is, it rarely seems to be calm where I live anymore...
Reply to
mjc1
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"mjc13<
You are right on in your guess of what the plane should look like.
I have a Lazy Bee (nitro, though) and it flies great in the wind. As a matter of fact, it is boring for me to fly it in calm conditions! I fly it regularly in winds of up to 25 MPH, at the beach.
One thing, though. When it is windy, it is nice to have the wind not be turbulent. If it blows across some trees or houses, and then onto the plane immediately, it is a lot harder. It is good to have it blowing across a field for a while before it gets to where you are flying.
So, I don't know what is out there that is ARF like the Lazy Bee, but something like it would be good.
Reply to
Morgans
80MPH??? Looks a bit too Extreme for me, but thanks. Maybe something with a similar body and wings, but about 1/3 the power...?
> > > "mjc13 @verizon.net>"
Reply to
mjc1
I'll look at the plane, and see if I can find a similar electric. I usually fly in an open field - I wouldn't risk a plane flying by houses at this stage. Thnaks for the response.
Reply to
mjc1
Any Multiplex jet...not sure if you can still get a picojet or twinjet, but they are fast enough to handle a fair breeze, and fairly indestructible with a little glassing added.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Take a look at our "Dixie Delta"... it's so light (5 oz flying wt) that it's quite impervious to crash damage. Handles wind nicely too :-)
Randy Model Airplane Engineering
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"mjc13 @verizon.net>" windy!"? The problem is, it rarely seems to be calm where I live anymore...
Reply to
R.J. Roman
Interesting, but I'm not really looking for a kit, and I'd prefer a pusher prop.
The 'X-Twin' looks intersting, but I can't find it for sale.
Reply to
mjc1
You might have a problem with foamies, though I've seen a Picojet flying recently and it should handle a good breeze quite well.
Check out the e_Bobcat pusher (pushycat) that was published in QEFI (quiet and electric flight international) about a year or so ago. Someone probably has produced a similar design in ARF form. There is definitely a depron version (Hobby Lobby or Hobby People?) but am not sure of the foam's wind capabilities.
Reply to
byrocat
Ive flown my picojet in relatively stiff breezes - around 15 gusting to 20-25mph, and although it dances around a bit, its got the speed and inertia to ride the bumps pretty well.
I don't enjoy flying in turbulence much tho. I like precision flying at low speeds..
A twinstar or twinjet is better - bigger and heavier.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
A late-comer to this thread, but TowerHobbies has an electric SuperSporter that flies well under adverse conditions. It comes with a brushed motor and gear drive. If you take those out and install an e-flite Power 10 brushless motor with a 45 amp controller and 3100 mh LiPo and 11x5.5 prop, you'll have a Great Plane, no pun intended.
Reply to
YankeeDelta2004_NOSPAM
Where can I find these planes online? And on a related note, this looks like Crap, but what do you folks think about this as a starter for windy flights? Is just a rudder for turns enough control?
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Reply to
mjc1
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Looks like its the funjet, microjet and the twinjet - the picojet is discontinued, shame cos it was a nice model. The funjet has replaced it.
And on a related note, this
I think it probably IS crap actually. Rudder is not a good idea for wind, as to control banks you have to turn the plane. I fly a lot of 2/3 channels stuff and its tricky in unsteady air. I'd rather fly without a rudder, in wind, and have ailerons and elevators.
The multiplex kits mostly fly pretty well, especially with power upgrades, bounce off most crashes and are heavy and fast enough to handle a far amount of wind. And they are not hard to fly. The twinstar makes a very decent trainer.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
That was my impression, too. Neat idea, but probably slow and awkward.
I'll check it out. Thanks.
Reply to
mjc1

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