Kicker?

Can anyone tell me what is the active chemical in "kicker" type products that
speed superglue bonding? Thanks in advance.
Reply to
Taja2
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If they'd wanted ya to know, they'd have told ya! :)
I've heard that baking soda and water works, but I have always used the real stuff, so I don't personally know. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
IIRC it is aeromatic analines.
-- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Do you want to know for (a) safety reasons, (b) to make your own cheap, or (c) to market your own kicker?
(a) I can get MSDS information for you, but you also want to pay attention to the carrier solvent used in any particular product as well when considering the overall hazard level
(b) don't bother
(c) gee, I can't seem to remember the chemical name ;-)
Typical spray type kickers are only 1-2% catalyst, the rest is solvent. The old favorite carrier was Freon 113, but of course that was banned and is replaced by other materials. I make kickers for use in our plant, varying the concentration and carrier for different jobs. But we have a fume hood and safety equipment.
Mike D
Reply to
Mike Dennett
acetone with nitro methane works good.
Reply to
jeboba
Obvious safety concerns there..... mk
Reply to
MK
You ARE kidding, right? I didn't see a smiley at the end.
-- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Acetone and nitromethane is a debonder, not a catalyst a.k.a. "kicker".
For debonder nitromethane is excellent and combined with acetone or MEK works well also and is cheaper.
Reply to
Mike Dennett
If I recall most of the common kickers use some sort of aromatic amine in a solvent. There are many different kinds, unfortunately, I do not know which one is the most common for our use.
Brian Allen
Reply to
Brian W. Allen
Almost any alkali does.
Bicarbonate of soda?
weak soa solution?
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
No, thats debonder.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
In my experience, a 'kickered' CA joint is crumbly and nearly useless for mechanical strength. Bill(oc)
Reply to
Bill Sheppard
In all seriousness, can someone please explain to me why "kicker" is necessary? I've never used it and don't honestly know why you would use it. Even with thick CA the longest I've ever had to support a bond is about 30 seconds. Is that too long for some?? Maybe because I live in a warm climate and the temperature always aids setting? Is "kicker" a true catalyst? Regards Shannon
Reply to
Shannon Parker
The reaction that turns cyanoacrylate polymer (liquid CA) into plastic is water. That's right, water. Those living in areas of high humidity rarely need to use any accelerant to get CA to bond.
-- Dave Thompson
Reply to
Dave Thompson
So would gently blowing on a joint speed up the setting by virtue of the moisture in your breath??
Reply to
David Hopper
That's what happens if you use to much. A very light misting works well.
-- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
oops! You are correct! My mistake.
Reply to
jeboba
It works for me. But just like WJC don't enhale! Joe L.
Reply to
JosLvng
Living in the southwest, if you build during the winter when the relative humidity can drop below 10%, you will grow old waiting for CA, even thin, to set. A shot of plain water on the joint before using CA aids the process here.
Rein
Reply to
Rein
Also homebrew kicker compositions such as water/baking soda tend to be real bad for bond quality, depending on how they are used.
But with a proper catalyst, and properly applied, no sweat, and the quality of the final bond is not affected.
In many cases the smaartest thing to do is to lightly spritz one part at least 15 seconds before you plan to bond it, and apply the adhesive to the other. These catalysts can stay surface active for several minutes. It is quite important to allow the solvents to flash off when bonding in the manner described above. leaving behind only the catalyst.
For assemblies where this is not possible and spritzing happens after, go easy! Give it time to work and try to remember that more is not likely better.
Like many things, one develops a "touch" for handling CA and kickers, though I know a few people for whom the touch isn;t wuite ther yet despite years of use. Just the way it is.
Mike D.
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Reply to
Mike Dennett

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