No Big Deal??

Last week, we had our Spring Big Bird event that drew 50 entrants, and a
couple of hundred spectators. Every year, it seems that we have one or two
guys who always bring out brand new planes and fly them for the first time
at these events. This year, one guy flew a new GeeBee Arf. When he took
off, the plane made an immediate left turn and flew OVER the pits and
spectators. The pilot, who was quite competent, guided it back, properly
trimmed it. The rest of the flight was uneventful.
There was another pilot, along with myself, who was quite disturbed by this.
At last night's meeting, I pointed out that this practice was in direct
violation of the very first item of the AMA safety code.
I really was not prepared for the reaction. They don't think it's a big
deal. What do you think?
Reply to
Bill
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Last week, we had our Spring Big Bird event that drew 50 entrants, and a couple of hundred spectators. Every year, it seems that we have one or two guys who always bring out brand new planes and fly them for the first time at these events. This year, one guy flew a new GeeBee Arf. When he took off, the plane made an immediate left turn and flew OVER the pits and spectators. The pilot, who was quite competent, guided it back, properly trimmed it. The rest of the flight was uneventful. There was another pilot, along with myself, who was quite disturbed by this. At last night's meeting, I pointed out that this practice was in direct violation of the very first item of the AMA safety code. I really was not prepared for the reaction. They don't think it's a big deal. What do you think?
Reply to
Bill
On 5/5/2004 1:55 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
An event IS NOT THE TIME TO DO A MAIDEN FLIGHT. You should do it several days before. Yes, inadvertent flight maneuvers can and do happen, especially with a plane you are not used to.
IMHO, it is not good to fly over the pits (even unintentionally). I did have it happen when a servo stripped out. Luckily, no one was hurt. The only vehicle to suffer damage was my own when the wing clipped the bumper (scratch rubbed out). HOWEVER, it could have seriously hurt someone or done some major damage.
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
If this was a sanctioned event he should have signed a form before he was allowed to fly at all. The form states that the plane has been flown before and it is safe. In effect NO FIRST FLIGHTS ALLOWED!! If he violated this rule then the CD, if there was one, should probably have grounded him the rest of the day, or at least that plane. It's folks that take safety lightly that cause the rest of us to look bad. My flame suit is on and ready. Eddie Fulmer CD AMA 63713
Reply to
Efulmer
That's a HELL of a big deal! Your event could lose all coverage if you knowingly allow things like that to happen. I know that in the pylon events I CD'd and attended, part of the registration form was a certification that the pilot signed stating that the plane had been successfully flown prior to the event. New planes were not allowed to compete without a check flight at an empty field first. Planes requiring extensive repairs between heats had to be checked before they were allowed to re-enter the event.
Allowing things like this is not alright. It is irresponsible.
-- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
Standing by with the fire hose for you! I completely agree. -- Paul McIntosh
Reply to
Paul McIntosh
A plane should NEVER be flown for the first time at a public event. Common sense dictates that. However, the AMA doesn't address it. The IMAA, which governs their own big bird events, does, however. The plane must be flown at least 5 times before being flown at an IMAA sanctioned event.
I am glad the pilot was competent enough to recover control and guide the plane away from the crowd. However, it IS serious, and a tragic event could have happened. In the future, possibly the governing body of the event should mandate that all entries be previously flown. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
Reply to
Dr1Driver
Sorry Gary, but you are WRONG. Pull out your AMA Safety Code for R/C and read RULE #1!
Reply to
Six_O'Clock_High
They don't think what is a big deal? The rule or the AMA?
Seriously, regardless whose rule it is, it makes too much sense to have a model proven before being flown at an event. Or for that matter, any public gathering which amounts to more than the usual saturday club group.
Maybe it's time to preach some safety at the field and meetings. If they don't get the idea then maybe you need to find a way to move them on. Or move on yourself! I have it easy, I'd simply make them 'personna non gratis' at my field and spread the word to the other clubs in driving distance.
Reply to
C.O.Jones
Competent??? or just plain LUCKY???? Personally, I do not believe a "competent" flier would have even done such a thing. Knowingly, endangering everyone is what he did. Check out my page 4 at the bottom.
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That DR-8 had a handful of flights on it in the week prior to a wing failure during an airshow. What I do not say in the text is the fuselage (with engine running) crashed at the feet of a woman that froze and never tried to move out of the way. In an instant, our club could have had a very very bad day, and that aircraft had been flown before. You simply never know. It`s bad enough flying with those who think the rules do not imply to them. It is a violation of AMA code, and nonsense such as that must also be a violation of any good club guidelines. At least two of you at the meeting know the difference between right and wrong. Pity the rest don`t.
rick markel
Reply to
Aileron37
Welcome to model aviation, AMA sport aviator style.
I often think the vast majority of members (and non-members as well) don't have the foggiest notion what the word safety means. I think they believe safety is what you do after something bad happens.
I'm also quite sure the vast majority of AMA members are only members to get the insurance, and for them everything else about AMA is either an unknown or of no importance.
It is most assuredly a big deal.
Item one in the AMA Safety Code has been item one in the AMA Safety Code for as long as I can remember.
It's not Rule Number One for no reason, y'know. Cheers, Fred McClellan The House Of Balsa Dust home.mindspring.com/~the-plumber
Reply to
Fred McClellan
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Aileron37) posted message IDon 05 May 2004 21:45:42 GMT
That'd be a D-8...not a DR-8.
Carry on.
Reply to
Todd Klondike
Sorry JB but as usual you're only half- informed. OTOH that's better than usual for you!! (;-))
DR said IMAA SANCTIONED even which also carries an AMA sanction. IMAA is more restrictive than IMAA.
IMAA Safety Code: >> 3.4 Flight Testing: All aircraft are to have been flight tested and flight trimmed with a minimum of six (6) flights before the model is allowed to fly at an IMAA Sanctioned event.
Reply to
CainHD
> >>Sorry Gary, but you are WRONG. Pull out your AMA Safety Code for R/C and >>read RULE #1! > > >Sorry JB but as usual you're only half- informed. OTOH that's better than usual >for you!! (;-)) > > >DR said IMAA SANCTIONED even which also carries an AMA sanction. IMAA is more >restrictive than IMAA. > >IMAA Safety Code: >> >3.4 Flight Testing: All aircraft are to have been flight tested and flight >trimmed with a minimum of six (6) flights before the model is allowed to fly at >an IMAA Sanctioned event. >
Reply to
Fred McClellan
What's that again? IMAA is more restrictive than IMAA?
I know what you meant but, someone being as nit picky an anal as you should be more careful!
Reply to
C.O.Jones
No big deal as long as nothing happened. Otherwise it would have been a different story. My opinion is that a planes first flight should never occur at an event. No matter how careful and meticulous a builder is, you never know what the plane will do the first time up. Anyone ever seen planes go in on their maiden flights??
John VB
Reply to
jjvb
TOUCHE'
IMAA is more restrictive than AMA is what it should be.
Reply to
CainHD
Thanks, so many years ago and all that:) rick markel
Reply to
Aileron37
Thanks, everyone who responded. I guess, for once, I didn't have my head up my "neither regions" by bringing this up at the meeting. I totally agree with Fred. Most guys think accidents are things that happen only to other guys. The CD at this event is a good friend, excellent pilot and meticulous builder. He is, however, somewhat opinionated and pig headed. When I first brought this up at the meeting, he said that that rule wasn't in the Safety Code. ????
Someone should publish a story about what happens to a club and those involved when an accident that causes personal injury or death happens at a flying field. The investigation by law enforcement, insurance companies and attorneys and what anyone even remotely connected has to go through. Maybe it would open some eyes about safety. Bill
Reply to
Bill

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