Re: Question on RC aircraft building plans

All I can think about is the location of doublers. I have used these to indicate the location of 1/32 ply doublers on solid sheet fuselage sides.
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation http://fly.mcintoshcentral.com

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Aha !
By "Doublers" you mean small rectangular pieces of balsa which run perpendicular to the fuselage (this model uses solid balsa sheet for the sides of the fuselage) as a strengthener?
Thanks,
matt ----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.models.rc.air Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 12:37 PM Subject: Re: Question on RC aircraft building plans

the
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These might be the location of fuselage formers.
Rein

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Most R/C plans of fuselages are cutaways or sections.
In normal drafting practice, a solid piece behind the section line is shown as an "unfilled" area. If the section line actually crosses the piece, it is shown as "filled" with some type of hatching, usually a standard ANSI pattern for the type of material shown. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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I bet that the solid tringles are the outline of the sheet fuselage sides, and the hollow ones are the outline of the sheet doublers for the inside front of the fuselage (usually thin plywood). Daze
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THAT is my take as well....ONE triangle delineates the fuselage side and the other is the doubler..!

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The triangles denote the edges of pieces that share lines on the planes. Usually fuse doublers. Filled triangles show the edges of one piece, hollow triangle the edges of the other. Very common on european plans.
Terry Holland www.goldenstaterc.com
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Matt , you've had some good advice and I think your question's been answered. However, I'm feeling pedantic tonight and - for future reference - the phrase 'scratch built' usually means you've drawn the plans yourself from images of the plane. If you're building from plans it's not scratch built! Cheers from Oz. (not too many flames please!)

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That's YOUR interpretation! ;^)
-- Paul McIntosh Desert Sky Model Aviation http://fly.mcintoshcentral.com

the
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"it's scratch built from plans" or "it's scratch built from my own design" .
If there was any more distinction between them then there would be a term in use to define it further. THEREFORE, if you had to make each part of a plane, its scratch-built. As used in this sentence ...
" I think I'll go check on my latest 'scratch-built from plans' spad im building. "
LOL !

the
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And just to make things more confusing, I've modified the design from the plans by scaling it down by about 8% and lowered the camber of the airfoil slightly to produce a little less drag.
Of course I would still never claim it as my design.
-- cheers,
matt

the
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I agree, Howard. Designer-built means you've drawn the plans and conceived the design yourself. Scratch-built means you cut each part to make a kit from someone else's plans and build that. Kit-built means you buy a kit with all the wood parts to build the plane. ARF, RTF, and other nomenclature means you're too lazy to build. :) Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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