Anyone adapting "lean" techniques to their shop?

Dudn't get much leaner than that. Basically a pithy denouement to my rant.
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
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---------- And your altitude determines your attitude.
One major reason for lack of active cooperation and possibly passive resistance is that in the past, "cooperation" has meant lots of additional work for no observable result, lay-offs, cuts in pay, and more "hassle" in the days work.
Another major reason is that increasingly "management' is seen as both greedy and having their head up their a$$, and they are felt to be one of the primary causes for the company's problems in the first place. Why do any favors for people you don't like or at least respect?
The WIIFM [What's In It For Me?] employee factor is never addressed.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Our "lean" manufacturing efforts are pretty basic, but very effective:
-Ask the operator what he hates doing the most. -Ask him why. -Spend some time and money to make that task easier and less error prone.
This simple process can apply to everything from cleaning the shop, to packaging, to running parts, to deburring, and everything in between.
I had an office "lean event" at the end of last year to make my life easier. A seat of JobBoss to remove hassle of shipping/billing, an extra printer, and a Space Pilot all combined for a nice increase in productivity, (and a nice decrease in stress).
Reply to
Joe788
"Bill" wrote in news:UbudnVaC9qtsGW7UnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.com:
We use Lean, Kaizen, 5S, etc. Works well for us.
I've seen differening implementations..my consensus is that if it's started at the grass-roots level of the shop floor with the folks who actually know whats going on and doing the work, and works it's way upward, it's very, very successful (See Toyota). However, when it's started at the top by dumbasses that have no clue how to actually *do* anything, it fails miserably. The complete success of the system depends on the implementation techniques.
Reply to
Anthony
You are absolutely correct Anthony. It's easy to implement Kaizen to office workers or assembly workers. In order to implement it in a machine shop one must be able to turn the whole shop upside down and backward and back again. I come from the school of "follow me" management. Instruct by doing. That is the key to leadership in a machine shop. It will be no different in this project. Instead of "do this", it will be "watch this". Kaizen sells itself with results.
Reply to
Bill
Hey Dale, how is your 6 pallet EC400 doing? She still gettin' the job done?
Reply to
Joe788
"Lean" is nothing more than pieces of Kaizan pulled out and labed with someone elses name. Most toolmakers when going to a lean class feel it's common sence because thats how we are taught as apprentices. But kaizan goes a lot farther. It has to do with the placement of equipment, placement of people, availability of resources to those people. Creating a system that monitors constant improvement, and putting systems in place that are long term.
I work in a machine shop next to a mall. The nearest steel supplier is 20 miles away. The companies around us have nothing to do with what we do. Most of the people who work there are not suited for that kind of work. The most motivation given is you get paid. There are no plans in place for excersize, or preventive health care, there are no classes teaching people how to deal with social issues at the workplace. The building is in Florida, and has absolutely no trees around it. It has a thin tin roof riddled with air conditioners running 24/7. The condensated clean water rolls off the roof from the AC creating erosion problems, as opposed to using that water for wire edm machines. People arent being tested to find out their strong and weak points.
That is the opposite of Kaizan.
Reply to
vinny
Don't walk away, RUN!
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
US machine guns dont get sold to drug cartels. They get sold to Mexico government offices, who then has personel who simply walk off with them.
The problems of Mexico are not the result of US actions...other than keeping an open boarder.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
(foolishly)
SPC.....grrrrrrr While at Tornos, we did some sample parts for a potential customer of a TOP-200. The TOP-200 was an amazing machine. Probably about 10 years ahead of it's time.=20
Anyway, these were some rather complicated parts, with pretty tight tolerances. I didn't do the demo, one of our other tech's did, but I was there to see it happen (was there for a different customer demo at the time). We had to keep the demo parts in order so the customer could run their SPC magic on them. The parts, BTW, were absolutely perfect.
The customer rejected the parts!=20
According to SPC rules, there is no such thing as a perfect machine (tooling, etc.), and there must be variation of some sort.
The parts flat-lined on their charts. They thought that was impossible. IIRC, they suspected us of inspecting the parts and only sending them the good ones.
We wound up having to run a macro to make the parts vary by a couple of tenths in order to pass SPC.
Matt
Reply to
Matt Stawicki
Let the Record show that "Proctologically Violated©®" on or about Sun, 26 Apr 2009 08:16:48 -0400 did write/type or cause to appear in alt.machines.cnc the following:
New Zeitgeist - sounds like a planet colonized by Germans and not like a paradigm shift without the clutch.
pyotr
- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Let the Record show that "DrFrye" on or about Sun, 26 Apr 2009 02:42:10 GMT did write/type or cause to appear in alt.machines.cnc the following:
Same as for a large shop: cut the crap.
Of course, in a large shop, the economies of scale come into play, both in good things and in 'bad' things. Is a 1% savings worth the effort on a thousand dollar job? Will you save more time after making the changes than you spent on making the changes? Yeah, I know, a tenner here, a tenner there, soon you are talking real money. But can you afford to be cost effective? One writer I know of says he programs quick and dirty, because he needs to crunch the numbers once, maybe twice. Twenty minutes from start to end of run is fine - it doesn't matter how clunky his code is, he needs answers soonest. It doesn't matter if he could write tighter code that will generate results in 10 minutes if it takes him two hours to do that.
- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Let the Record show that Joe788 on or about Sun, 26 Apr 2009 09:13:46 -0700 (PDT) did write/type or cause to appear in alt.machines.cnc the following:
I kept a notebook on the jobs I ran. Which became known as The Notebook. Which I kept when I got canned. Which they now wish they had, because I had not only the big details, but the tweeks. Like the adjustments to make to allow 12 hrs of work to be completed in six hours. (Simple part: drill holes, cut slot in tube. When I had it all set up, 58 seconds button to button.)
Yeah, that's a lot of it, cut the crap, fix the "little" things.
tschus pyotr
- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
lean, agile, buzz words, trickeration, blah blah blah, quality says more Michael
Reply to
Michael
A vise good enough to go on a POS VMC with poor maintenance where for years according to you the automatic lubrication oil gage always read zero, tools bang out of the spindle and randomly shoot through the carrousel to bounce around in the work area. like the machines you said you program, setup and operate but don't/didn't do the daily operator checks.
How many tools can handle being shot out of the spindle, through the carousel and bounced around in the work area?
Last time you mentioned a piece of equipment you were looking to add to your garage shop at best Jon could only be described as a hobby grade machine, so much for quality when YOUR money is involved.
What CAD/CAM system did you buy for your garage shop Jon?
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
The best conditioned team won't succeed unless they play as a team instead of a group of individuals.
See above
Redefined or maybe just defined in the first place.
Don't be so sure of that. Somebody is going to have to pay fot the mess made during the last 40 years.
JC
Reply to
John R. Carroll
PV De-Motivational System or when you just don't care anymore.)
Defeat For every winner there are dozens of losers, odds are you're one of them.
Stupidity Quitters never win, winners never quit, but those who never win and never quit are idiots.
Failure When your best just isn't good enough.
Futility You'll always miss 100% of the shots you don't take and statistically speaking 99% of the shots you do.
Ineptitude If you can't learn to do something well, learn to enjoy doing it poorly.
Losing If at first you don't succeed failure may be your style.
Mediocrity It takes a lot less time and most people won't notice the difference until it's too late.
Mistakes It could be that the purpose of your life is only to serve as a warning to others.
Pessimism Every dark cloud has a silver inning, but lightning kills hundreds of people each year who are trying to find it.
Procrastination Hard work often pays off after time, but laziness always pays off now.
Agony Not all pain is gain.
Reply to
brewertr
Indeed.
So then, we will be better off selling our young, instead of eating them.
Which, if PBS is correct, is already happening.
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
If you don't care - because you'll be dead - it really doesn't matter.
Wrong tense. Happened. The real difficulty will manifest itself when the next generation's lack of ownership takes root. This leads right back to the thread topic. Unless everyone involved in any enterprise feels they own it it won't succed except for a sliver of the group and isn't, therefore, sustainable. Less and less value is extacted or added with every iterration.
JC
Reply to
John R. Carroll
----------- Problem is the use of the same word for two different things, and you both are right.
*INVESTMENT*, either as sweat and/or money, and stock ownership in a small corporation with a few other stockholders and the continual presence at the plant is far different than stock "ownership," where the stock is purchased on the secondary market, generally from speculator who wants out, with none of the funds going to the company, huge numbers of anonymous stockholders, only a few of who may be investors, and no interaction between these stockholders and the officers/management, who in general have no "hands on" (other than on the company assets).
I know of no stockholder meeting where a majority of the stockholders approved management's plan to continue to pay them selves big bonuses and maintain the stock dividend by borrowing money until the corporation goes bankrupt. I know of no stockholder meetings where management's plan to allocate over 50% of any profits, paper or real, to the executive bonus plan, regardless of the risks taken to generate these profits. Yet General Motors and Lehman Brothers implemented exactly these plans and policies.
It is difficult to determine at exactly what level of organizational size this occurs, but operationally, the major American corporations are beyond *ANY* control by their nominal owners, i.e. the stockholders.
Because they can bring the "house of cards" down, some of the major secured creditors and those with CDS insurance still have a hammer where they are providing revolving lines of credit and/or short term financing they can refuse to renew, they can occasionally affect corporate governance, such as forcing the removal of Chairman and CEO "Bonus Bob" Nardalli from Home Depot (now at Chrysler) after a series of increasing losses and increasing bonuses. (compensation totaled about 210 million $US for two years)
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee

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