CNC Bridgeport with Heidenhein control

Someone is offering me a Bridgeport Series II Interact CNC mill. He says that it worked but the Heidenhein controller is no longer
operational. Whether this is true or not, as always is questionable.
The price is $500.
My question is, can this somehow be fixed or a newer control installed. Does this require supernatural qualifications, or do you think that I could do it with some diagnostic and part swapping skills.
Also could I run this as a regular manual mill.
I need the answer ASAP
Thanks
i
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Clarification, he says that the monitor is not working. Assuming it is true and so on
i

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On Feb 23, 11:53 am, Ignoramus21067 <ignoramus21...@NOSPAM. 21067.invalid> wrote:

Heidenhein uses an etched bar and optical components to watch the etching. Pretty straight forward and failure proof. We had two different pick-and-place machines made in England that used that system. The oldest was 20+ years and the system had never given a moment's problem. I suspect the owner is correct and the monitor is the problem. Should be pretty easy to find another RS-170 monitor.
Paul
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Pete and Paul, I agreed to buy this mill and will meet the guy tonight and pay, and get some pieces, pickup to occur in 1-2 weeks. He seems to be good.
i
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Ignoramus21067 wrote:

That machine was British made judging by some of the parts.
John
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Looks like a 3 axis mill, the control upgrade isn't too difficult but you have to take it one step at a time. If you want to later you can put an encoder and VFD on the spindle and you can do rigid tapping by synchronizing the up/down feed with the spindle position. And later you could put a motor on a dividing head and do 4 axis milling, lots of possibilities, EMC2 is very configurable.
I remember your programs that you did CNC type motion by hand cranking on a manual mill, you can write similar programs to produce CNC code if you want. Anyway, for CNC the controller tells the motors to make the motions you were doing by hand, but at high speed and in smaller steps.
RogerN
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I will be happy with three axis as a start, if I can make it to work. I would love to chat with you on the phone for a few minutes just to get started a bit.
i
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On Feb 23, 6:59 pm, Ignoramus21067 <ignoramus21...@NOSPAM. 21067.invalid> wrote:

IS that a Philips screwdriver I see in the collet in the machine?
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On 2/23/2010 10:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@coinet.com wrote:

Looks like a center drill to me..
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    Focus was unusually poor for your work.
    Looks like servo motors, based on the one to the left of the head, so if it is more than just the monitor, you may want to go with the EMC package based on linux.
    Tooling looks nice -- including a sacrifical tooling plate to protect the table.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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Iggy,
Refitting CNC machines has become my real hobby. I also make a few bucks on the side consulting on Camsoft refit installs.
$500 is a fair price. The machine is only sutiable for a refit. Don't beat a dead horse trying to make the old control run.
I assume you're just buying on speculation. But, if you're going into the refit biz, email me offline.
Karl
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Karl, since Heidenhein switched to PC-architecture controls around ten years ago (or offered them as an option), what is the chance that they could supply the necessary bits to convert Iggy's machine into one that's PC-controlled?
--
Ed Huntress



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To put this bluntly, if I can convert this mill to something I can control with a (preferably Linux) PC, I will keep this mill.
I do not know even the basics of CNC, so I do not know what interfaces with what and what can be replaced.
Is that a 2 dimensional CNC machine? (I know that it is a dumb idea to ask at this point in the game).
i
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If you're asking about the two systems that Heidenhein offered as options (one was based on their proprietary controller; the other was based on a "hardened," industrial PC), then the answer is that they both were multi-axis systems. I don't know how many axes they could control, but they both were at least 3-axis.
I spent a half-day with them and wrote about both systems around 8 years ago. Too bad my memory is volatile. <g>
--
Ed Huntress



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Ignoramus21067 wrote:

There should be a parameter sheet that goes with the control. Make sure you get it. IF the battery in the control memory goes dead you have to punch in all the parameters manually to get the control up and running. If its only the monitor bad that is an easy fix.
John
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john wrote:

It is rather unlikely the control will survive the move without some new problem coming up. The older the control, the more fragile they get, as the number of separate circuit boards and connections was much higher on the early ones. This is probably a mid-80's control at the latest, and unless you were a minicomputer hardware tech in a previous life, I don''t think you want to get involved it trying to keep it running.
I adopted a 1978-vintage Allen-Bradley CNC control in 1997 and managed to get it running, which was a HUGE ordeal, requiring disassembling the paper tapes for the executive program so i could modify it, building a "BTR" so I could dispense with paper tapes, etc. But, it had major breakdowns 3 times in 9 months, and I was getting TIRED of maintaining the DAMN thing! Your Heidenhain control is likely a bit newer, but still VERY much in the aged category now, roughly 20+ years old. So, I would strongly recommend a retrofit, too. Depending on whose servo amps are in it, they may be able to be reused, which will make the retrofit easier. Depending on the type of position encoder on the machine, these may be reused, too. With Heidenhain, there may be signal converter/interpolator boxes associated especially with linear scales that need to be kept.
There are several servo interfaces available for EMC that you can choose from (I make one kind).
Jon
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Can you explain what you mean.

Tell us about it Jon.
i
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Ignoramus26960 wrote:

OK, I have two flavors. One is for use with velocity servo amps that take +/- 10 V analog velocity command signals. It is a very flexible board set, meaning you can mix and match boards for the actual number of I/Os you need. It runs $780 for the basic 4-axis set, that gives 4 encoder counters, 4 16-bit 10 V DACs and 16 digital inputs and 8 SSR output locations, plus an E-stop circuit.
See http://pico-systems.com/oscrc4/catalog/index.php?cPath=8 for a look at this system.
I also have another system that is for use with my own servo amps, which use digital PWM commands to the amps. This is here http://pico-systems.com/oscrc4/catalog/index.php?cPath=3 and the controller board is $250, and the servo amps are $125 each for the brush motor version. If your servo amps are in good shape, velocity servo amps with tachometer feedback can be VERY smooth, and reusing them will save you some rewiring. The cost between the two systems is not all that different.
Jon
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