Drill speeds & feeds

Hi All,
After 20 yrs away from engineering I am now back and using a CNC Miller (Hurco VM1).
I have speed and feed charts for milling cutters but I am having
problems finding them for HSS Drill bits.
What I'm looking for are charts for drill sizes up to about 25-30mm and the recomended speeds and feeds for Mild Steel, 316 stainless and aluminium (304 stainless would be handy as well).
I know that they must be out there on the net somewhere but I am struggling to find them.
Can anyone help, please.
P.S metric charts would be more useful than imperial as that is what I mainly work in, but in desperation I will convert them.
Cheers all
Davor
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Davor wrote:

Davor:
    Here are a few:
http://www.menlo-usa.com/enguide/eg13.html
    The above one has dual inch/metric numbers.
http://www.darex.com/main/content/view/28/60/
http://tinyurl.com/qhlhy
    The above site has some useful formulas as well.
--
BottleBob
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The other links were comprehensive... But in case you want something similar - simplified, check this link out:
http://www.multi-drill.com/drill-speed-chart.htm
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 (908) 542-0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

Thanks for the chart. I have one question. Is there a reason the feed for a one inch drill in plastic is less than the feed for the same drill in low carbon steel or aluminum?
Later,
Charlie
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All the numbers on the multi-drill.com chart are what I call "safe" numbers. They are for the guy or gal trying to set up a machine that is not programmable like a CNC machine would be. They are all well below the thresholds of there problems would normally occur and take into account that the average Joe isn't using perfectly sharp tools or super-rigid machines.
...In other words, they are roughly the numbers we use for our machines which cost low thousands VS tens of thousands or more for larger, more capable and more highly controllable machines.
All speculation aside, I simply don't know why... Someone with materials expertise might be able to answer with a definite answer.
You did peak a different question for me though... Why is the stainless so low? Stainless ruins tools by holding heat near the tool - so many folks get better results with deep, heavy cuts in cooler material. NOT on my machines per say, but only because mine aren't made for very heavy applications.
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Joe Agro, Jr.
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

I should have been able to finger that one out myself ;-)
Seeing wood and plastic lumped together should have clued me, 'cause even I know you can't drill glass filled nylon as fast as you can MDF.

But your answer about it being a ballpark chart was good enough for me.

Funny how heat keeps rearing its head when the quality of the cut comes into question. It doesn't get talked about enough. People just keep wasting it (hot air) debating useless issues. :-)
Later,
Charlie
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