Neat Metalworking Site

To All:
    Here's an informative metalworking site (Shopswarf), I ran across while searching for something else. I've listed the address and Index
below.
=====================================================http://shopswarf.orconhosting.net.nz/sindex.html
Air, Compressed: Horsepower required.. Aluminum Alloys, Tempers and Terminology Bolt Head Identification, SAE & ASTM Carbide Turning Insert Identication (ANSI) Carbide Toolholder Identification Chucks: Lathe, Spindle Nose Dimensions Circle: Rules Relative To.. Collets: Dimensions to identify... Collets: Milling..... Collets: Types for Various Machines Drills: Number & Letter with Metric & Inch Sizing Endmills: Speed & Feed Data End Milling: Data for Different Materials Feeds & Speeds for HSS Drills, Reamers & Taps Gages: In use in the U.S.A. Gauges, Wire: Comparisons Gears: Module Gear Formulae Gears: Spur Gear Terms & Calculations Grinding Wheel: Standard Markings Grinding Wheel: Standard Markings, Diamond & Cubic Boron Horizontal Milling Machine Testing Procedures Miscellaneous Index: All sorts of Bits n Pieces Metals: Physical Properties of OLD MACHINE TOOLS. . . Punching: Tonnage required for Punching Holes in Mild Steel & Brass Screw Threads: Shaper Tool Grinding Angles For Mild Steel. Sheetmetal Gauge: German D.I.N. Standard Spacing Table: Hole Specifications of American Spindle Noses Steel: AISI & SAE Basic Numbering System Steel: Alloy Steels Nearest Equivalents Steel: Spark Test for Steels Steel: Color Codes Taper Pins: British Standard Tapers & Angles Tapers: Brown & Sharpe Tapers: Jarno Tapers: Morse Temperatures: High, Judged By Colour Tempering Colours Temperature: Centigrade to Fahrenheit Table Temperature: Fahrenheit to Centigrade Table Tensile Strength Comparison Turning Tool Angles Vee Belt Grooves: Sheave Dimensions Verse: McAndrews Hymn Wire Gauges ======================================================
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BottleBob
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Good stuff, thx BB Fer grins I looked at Titanium milling -------------- blank.......hehehe. guess your not suppose to? Better tell my boss. <g>
--
gil

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cncmillgil wrote:

Gil:
    I think the two following lines after the blank one relate to machining titanium. One says "Under Rc 30" and the other says "Rc 30-40".     BUT, the data seems old since they mention using HSS and Cobalt as the end mill cutting tool materials for all their data. So I don't know how useful that particular chart would be now-a-days with the widespread use of solid and inserted carbide end mills as well as PVD diamond and some ceramic inserts.
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cncmillgil wrote:

Gil:
    Ya know, I've done some Ti over the years. In fact I remember posting an article about it. The title was something like "Take a bite out of titanium". Let me see if I can find it.....
    Here it is. It was a post from 2006. I'm surprised I got the title even close since I can barely remember what I had for breakfast yesterday.
=================================================================http://www.hanita.com/hanita_protected/hanita-art3.htm
Titanium alloys' elasticity, so beneficial to finished parts, makes them especially difficult to machine. Under cutting pressures, the "springy" materials move away from the tool. Consequently, the cutting edges rub rather than cut, particularly when making light cuts. The rubbing process generates more heat, compounding problems caused by poor thermal conductivity.
As a result of the normal cutting process, titanium alloys tend to workharden. This is especially true when an inappropriate tool is applied. Instead of cutting the part, the wrong tool "pushes" it, straining the alloy. As the material moves away from the cutting edge it deforms plastically rather than elastically. Plastic deformation increases the material's strength - and, unfortunately, its hardness - at the point of cut. As the alloy reaches a higher level of hardness and strength, cutting speeds that were appropriate at the start of the cut become excessive, and the tool wears dramatically.
Milling titanium alloys requires high chip loads, resulting in high torque being generated. That makes it essential to break chips into smaller pieces, especially when making heavy roughing cuts. Using roughing end mills and various types of chipbreakers considerably reduces cutting-edge pressure.
The "phobia" about using titanium nitride(TiN)-coated tools to cut titanium alloys seems unfounded. There is a fear that chemical reactions eventually will occur between the titanium elements. Experience doesn't bear this out. In fact, TiN coatings have provided some small improvements in certain applications. But in most cases, TiN-coated HSS tools don't perform any better than uncoated ones when machining titanium.
Titanium alloys respond best to heavy cuts generating thick, well-defined chips. There are limits, though, because of the high torque generated. As a general rule, width of cut should be no more than 30 percent of tool diameter.
Cut titanium alloys at continuous feed rates. Never allow the tool to "dwell" in the workpiece. ===================================================================
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So, does that mean that if I use a dull tool for the final finish pass, at a very small DOC it will give me a "Forged" part?
Obligatory (grin)
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Half-nutz wrote:

HN:
    Weeeell, you know it might not end up being officially "forged" but the surface hardness would probably go up. I wonder if any experiments have been done with this. Perhaps something like roller burnishing on side walls, or the like.
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